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Radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Recommended safety procedures for installation and use of veterinary x-ray equipment - safety code 28

Technical Report:

Abstract

Diagnostic radiology is an essential part of present-day veterinary practice. The need for radiation protection exists because occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can result in deleterious effects that may manifest themselves not only in exposed individuals but in their descendants as well. These are respectively called somatic and genetic effects. Somatic effects are characterized by observable changes occurring in the body organs of the exposed individual. These changes may appear from within a few hours to many years later, depending on the amount and duration of exposure of the individual. In veterinary medicine, the possibility that anyone may be exposed to enough radiation to create somatic effect is extremely remote. Genetic effects are more a cause for concern at the lower doses used in veterinary radiology. Although the radiation doses may be small and appear to cause no observable damage, the probability of chromosomal damage in the germ cells, with the consequence of mutations, does exist. These mutations may give rise to genetic defects and therefore make these doses significant when applied to a large number of individuals. There are two main aspects of the problem to be considered. First, personnel working with X-ray equipment must be protected from excessive  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1991
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
EHD-TR-151
Reference Number:
SCA: 560190; PA: AIX-24:006168; SN: 93000931232
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1991
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; RADIATION PROTECTION; VETERINARY MEDICINE; RECOMMENDATIONS; SAFETY; X-RAY EQUIPMENT; X-RAY SOURCES; 560190; RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS
OSTI ID:
10118834
Research Organizations:
Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Health Protection Branch
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE93611717; ISBN 0-660-13684-8; TRN: CA9201034006168
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
[39] p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

None. Radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Recommended safety procedures for installation and use of veterinary x-ray equipment - safety code 28. Canada: N. p., 1991. Web.
None. Radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Recommended safety procedures for installation and use of veterinary x-ray equipment - safety code 28. Canada.
None. 1991. "Radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Recommended safety procedures for installation and use of veterinary x-ray equipment - safety code 28." Canada.
@misc{etde_10118834,
title = {Radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Recommended safety procedures for installation and use of veterinary x-ray equipment - safety code 28}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {Diagnostic radiology is an essential part of present-day veterinary practice. The need for radiation protection exists because occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can result in deleterious effects that may manifest themselves not only in exposed individuals but in their descendants as well. These are respectively called somatic and genetic effects. Somatic effects are characterized by observable changes occurring in the body organs of the exposed individual. These changes may appear from within a few hours to many years later, depending on the amount and duration of exposure of the individual. In veterinary medicine, the possibility that anyone may be exposed to enough radiation to create somatic effect is extremely remote. Genetic effects are more a cause for concern at the lower doses used in veterinary radiology. Although the radiation doses may be small and appear to cause no observable damage, the probability of chromosomal damage in the germ cells, with the consequence of mutations, does exist. These mutations may give rise to genetic defects and therefore make these doses significant when applied to a large number of individuals. There are two main aspects of the problem to be considered. First, personnel working with X-ray equipment must be protected from excessive exposure to radiation during their work. Secondly, personnel in the vicinity of veterinary X-ray facilities and the general public require adequate protection.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1991}
month = {Dec}
}