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HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria

Technical Report:

Abstract

This report describes an investigation into the applicability of high performance liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation of the complex mixtures of organic acids commonly found in groundwaters. This work has shown that reverse phase ion-pair chromatography using a large pore stationary phase can be successfully applied to humic material in both natural and concentrated groundwater from the Drigg Research Site. The methodology separates the organic species into a number of well resolved components the majority of which have a molecular weight of greater than 500 Dalton. Separations obtained have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed using a Diode array spectrophotometer. The components in excess of 500 Dalton show UV absorption spectra similar to humic and fulvic acids where as the component with a molecular weight of less than 500 Dalton shows a sharp UV absorption cutoff at 230 nm. It was noted that this component was not removed by passage through DEAEA cellulose. Reverse phase HPLC was also investigated, and results were found to be consistent with a separation based on an ion-repulsion/size exclusion mechanism. It was concluded that any separation based on this mechanism is likely to suffer from poor inter run reproducibility and must therefore be discounted as  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1991
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
BGS-TR-WE-91/7
Reference Number:
SCA: 540230; 052002; PA: AIX-24:005583; SN: 93000930732
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1991
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; GROUND WATER; HUMIC ACIDS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FULVIC ACIDS; LIQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PH VALUE; 540230; 052002; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS MONITORING AND TRANSPORT; WASTE DISPOSAL AND STORAGE
OSTI ID:
10118728
Research Organizations:
British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE93611270; CNN: Contract CEC F1-1W-0203-UK(H); TRN: GB9203662005583
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
[59] p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Smith, B. HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria. United Kingdom: N. p., 1991. Web.
Smith, B. HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria. United Kingdom.
Smith, B. 1991. "HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_10118728,
title = {HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria}
author = {Smith, B}
abstractNote = {This report describes an investigation into the applicability of high performance liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation of the complex mixtures of organic acids commonly found in groundwaters. This work has shown that reverse phase ion-pair chromatography using a large pore stationary phase can be successfully applied to humic material in both natural and concentrated groundwater from the Drigg Research Site. The methodology separates the organic species into a number of well resolved components the majority of which have a molecular weight of greater than 500 Dalton. Separations obtained have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed using a Diode array spectrophotometer. The components in excess of 500 Dalton show UV absorption spectra similar to humic and fulvic acids where as the component with a molecular weight of less than 500 Dalton shows a sharp UV absorption cutoff at 230 nm. It was noted that this component was not removed by passage through DEAEA cellulose. Reverse phase HPLC was also investigated, and results were found to be consistent with a separation based on an ion-repulsion/size exclusion mechanism. It was concluded that any separation based on this mechanism is likely to suffer from poor inter run reproducibility and must therefore be discounted as a suitable method. Similarly, ion-suppression reverse phase was shown to be equally impracticable, requiring a mobile phase pH of less than 2 to obtain separation (this low pH renders a silica based stationary phase unstable). (author).}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1991}
month = {Dec}
}