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Professional aspects of nuclear safety. A brief submitted to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

Design and operation of nuclear facilities in Ontario are performed by professionals who have more at stake in the nuclear scene than the average resident of the province. Their technical expertise is constantly under scrutiny by their employers, the Atomic Energy Control Board, and the dissenting factions in the community. They and their families live close to nuclear facilities. It is highly unlikely that these professionals would assume a less than cautious approach to their work. The professional staff at both AECL-CANDU Operations and at Ontario Hydro have employee associations that date back many years. The presence of these associations has helped professional employees to divorce their labour-related concerns from their technical responsibilities to the advantage of the public. With the backing of their associations, the professional employees have encouraged the employers to sponsor career development programs to help them maintain state-of-the-art expertise. Employers have sponsored attendance and participation at technical seminars, many of them international. These benefits and privileges have contributed to improved standards in design, but most importantly the protection afforded by collective agreements to professional integrity has permitted engineers and other professionals to insist on the highest possible design standards.
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1987
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-mf-13415
Reference Number:
SCA: 210400; PA: AIX-24:007456; SN: 93000932276
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1987
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; CANDU TYPE REACTORS; DESIGN; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; LABOR RELATIONS; CANADA; PERSONNEL; QUALITY ASSURANCE; REACTOR SAFETY; 210400; POWER REACTORS, NONBREEDING, OTHERWISE MODERATED OR UNMODERATED
OSTI ID:
10118325
Research Organizations:
Federation of Engineering and Scientific Associations (FESA), Toronto, ON (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE93612456; TRN: CA9200994007456
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
[17] p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

None. Professional aspects of nuclear safety. A brief submitted to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Canada: N. p., 1987. Web.
None. Professional aspects of nuclear safety. A brief submitted to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Canada.
None. 1987. "Professional aspects of nuclear safety. A brief submitted to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review." Canada.
@misc{etde_10118325,
title = {Professional aspects of nuclear safety. A brief submitted to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {Design and operation of nuclear facilities in Ontario are performed by professionals who have more at stake in the nuclear scene than the average resident of the province. Their technical expertise is constantly under scrutiny by their employers, the Atomic Energy Control Board, and the dissenting factions in the community. They and their families live close to nuclear facilities. It is highly unlikely that these professionals would assume a less than cautious approach to their work. The professional staff at both AECL-CANDU Operations and at Ontario Hydro have employee associations that date back many years. The presence of these associations has helped professional employees to divorce their labour-related concerns from their technical responsibilities to the advantage of the public. With the backing of their associations, the professional employees have encouraged the employers to sponsor career development programs to help them maintain state-of-the-art expertise. Employers have sponsored attendance and participation at technical seminars, many of them international. These benefits and privileges have contributed to improved standards in design, but most importantly the protection afforded by collective agreements to professional integrity has permitted engineers and other professionals to insist on the highest possible design standards.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1987}
month = {Sep}
}