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Kalina cycles for power generation from industrial waste heat

Technical Report:

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities to produce power from industrial waste heat, using cycles with non-azeotropic ammonia-water mixtures. In this study, some simple Kalina cycle designs have been calculated for applications of industrial waste heat and moderate temperature, about 300-400 degrees C, from gas streams in the iron and steel industry or elsewhere. Calculations on cycle efficiency have been carried out for application in which the Kalina cycle works as a condensing cycle and also others, on which it provides heat for process streams. The results show that a Kalina cycle is a more efficient condensing power cycle than the Rankine cycle for this kind of waste heat. The first law cycle efficiency varies with the heat source inlet and minimum temperature and is 22-30% for the Kalina cycle and 16-29% for the Rankine cycle. The analysis of the two cases in which the power cycle provides heat for process streams shows that Kalina cycle technology can be used for this kind of application. A Kalina cycle can be modified to work as a back pressure cycle with or without a condensing tail. In the latter case, the modified Kalina cycle can produce power with  More>>
Authors:
Olsson, Eva; Thorin, E; Svedberg, G [1] 
  1. Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Heat Technology
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1993
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NUTEK-VK-93-17
Reference Number:
SCA: 320304; 425007; PA: SWD-93:007412; EDB-94:019052; NTS-94:008787; ERA-19:006896; SN: 94001129791
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1993
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 42 ENGINEERING; METAL INDUSTRY; WASTE HEAT UTILIZATION; COGENERATION; AZEOTROPE; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; RANKINE CYCLE; AMMONIA; BOTTOMING CYCLES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; 320304; 425007; WASTE HEAT RECOVERY AND UTILIZATION; OTHER
OSTI ID:
10117128
Research Organizations:
Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK), Stockholm (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE94730431; CNN: Project NUTEK-566-024; TRN: SE9307412
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
20 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Olsson, Eva, Thorin, E, and Svedberg, G. Kalina cycles for power generation from industrial waste heat. Sweden: N. p., 1993. Web.
Olsson, Eva, Thorin, E, & Svedberg, G. Kalina cycles for power generation from industrial waste heat. Sweden.
Olsson, Eva, Thorin, E, and Svedberg, G. 1993. "Kalina cycles for power generation from industrial waste heat." Sweden.
@misc{etde_10117128,
title = {Kalina cycles for power generation from industrial waste heat}
author = {Olsson, Eva, Thorin, E, and Svedberg, G}
abstractNote = {The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities to produce power from industrial waste heat, using cycles with non-azeotropic ammonia-water mixtures. In this study, some simple Kalina cycle designs have been calculated for applications of industrial waste heat and moderate temperature, about 300-400 degrees C, from gas streams in the iron and steel industry or elsewhere. Calculations on cycle efficiency have been carried out for application in which the Kalina cycle works as a condensing cycle and also others, on which it provides heat for process streams. The results show that a Kalina cycle is a more efficient condensing power cycle than the Rankine cycle for this kind of waste heat. The first law cycle efficiency varies with the heat source inlet and minimum temperature and is 22-30% for the Kalina cycle and 16-29% for the Rankine cycle. The analysis of the two cases in which the power cycle provides heat for process streams shows that Kalina cycle technology can be used for this kind of application. A Kalina cycle can be modified to work as a back pressure cycle with or without a condensing tail. In the latter case, the modified Kalina cycle can produce power with what can be regarded as an efficiency of 96%, i.e. the ratio between power production and extra heat demand for the system. The extra degree of freedom that the Kalina cycle has because of its possibility to vary the composition can be used to adjust the cycle to variations in heat source conditions with preserved cycle efficiency. The Kalina cycle can also take advantage of low ambient temperature much better than the Rankine cycle. The principal reasons for these advantages and the potential for high efficiencies are the non-isothermal boiling and condensation and the possibility to vary the composition. 11 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1993}
month = {Mar}
}