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South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga)

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

The Treaty of Rarotonga creates a ``nuclear-free``, rather than a ``nuclear-weapon-free``, zone. The former term was chosen for a number of reasons. It was the intention of the signatories to the Treaty to keep the region free of the stationing of nuclear weapons, nuclear testing and environmental pollution by radioactive waste. Moreover, they wished to prohibit all types of nuclear explosions. Accordingly, the operative articles of the Treaty refer consistently to ``nuclear explosive devices``, a term which is interpreted to cover all such devices, irrespective of the purpose (military or peaceful) stated for their use. The Final Document of the first special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, unanimously adopted by the Assembly in 1978, states that nuclear-weapon-free zones should be established on the basis of arrangements freely arrived at among the States of the region concerned and taking into account the region`s characteristics, and that the process of establishing such zones in different parts of the world should be encouraged with the ultimate objective of achieving a world entirely free of nuclear weapons. The members of the South Pacific Forum concluded the Treaty of Rarotonga as a step in that process.
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1987
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-mf-13042
Reference Number:
SCA: 350101; PA: AIX-23:015271; SN: 92000647018
Resource Relation:
Journal Issue: No. 53; Other Information: DN: Published in the official languages of the United Nations.; PBD: Dec 1987; Related Information: Disarmament fact sheet
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; RAROTONGA TREATY; NON-PROLIFERATION POLICY; ARMS CONTROL; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PACIFIC OCEAN; REGIONAL COOPERATION; 350101; TREATIES
OSTI ID:
10115329
Research Organizations:
United Nations, New York, NY (USA). Dept. for Disarmament Affairs
Country of Origin:
UN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92615183; TRN: XU9100015015271
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
13 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

None. South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga). UN: N. p., 1987. Web.
None. South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga). UN.
None. 1987. "South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga)." UN.
@misc{etde_10115329,
title = {South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga)}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {The Treaty of Rarotonga creates a ``nuclear-free``, rather than a ``nuclear-weapon-free``, zone. The former term was chosen for a number of reasons. It was the intention of the signatories to the Treaty to keep the region free of the stationing of nuclear weapons, nuclear testing and environmental pollution by radioactive waste. Moreover, they wished to prohibit all types of nuclear explosions. Accordingly, the operative articles of the Treaty refer consistently to ``nuclear explosive devices``, a term which is interpreted to cover all such devices, irrespective of the purpose (military or peaceful) stated for their use. The Final Document of the first special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, unanimously adopted by the Assembly in 1978, states that nuclear-weapon-free zones should be established on the basis of arrangements freely arrived at among the States of the region concerned and taking into account the region`s characteristics, and that the process of establishing such zones in different parts of the world should be encouraged with the ultimate objective of achieving a world entirely free of nuclear weapons. The members of the South Pacific Forum concluded the Treaty of Rarotonga as a step in that process.}
issue = {No. 53}
place = {UN}
year = {1987}
month = {Dec}
}