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Usability of catalytic gas cleaning in a simplified IGCC power system. Deactivation of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Literature review

Technical Report:

Abstract

Nickel-based catalysts have proven to be efficient for tar and ammonia decomposition in laboratory scale gas purification experiments, in which biomass, peat and coal gasification was applied. A potential location for a separate catalyst reactor for an IGCC process using biomass gas derived from a fluidized-bed gasifier is downstream of cyclones before the ceramic filter unit. Complex nature of biomass and peat gas cannot be simulated completely in the laboratory. Long-term tests using a gas stream from an operating gasifier are likely the best way to test catalyst deactivation. Catalyst deactivation may be chemical, mechanical or thermal. Poisoning, fouling, thermal degradation and vaporization are the four intrinsic mechanisms. Poisoning and thermal degradation are generally slow and irreversible; fouling with coke and carbon is rapid but easily reversed by gasification. Loss of metals by vaporization is completely irreversible. Deactivation is more easily prevented than cured. Poisoning by impurities may be prevented by purifying the reactants. Carbon deposition and coking may be prevented by minimizing formation of precursors and by manipulating mass-transfer regimes to minimize the effect of carbon or coke on activity. Sintering is avoided by operating at a low temperature. The catalyst should also have a sufficient mechanical strength so  More>>
Authors:
Hepola, J [1] 
  1. Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Fuel and Process Technology
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1993
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
VTT-TIED-1445
Reference Number:
SCA: 200202; PA: FI-95:003062; EDB-95:028141; SN: 95001320414
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1993
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COMBINED-CYCLE POWER PLANTS; HOT GAS CLEANUP; CATALYSTS; DEACTIVATION; GASIFICATION; TAR; AMMONIA; 200202; NOXIOUS GAS AND PARTICULATE EMISSIONS
OSTI ID:
10115096
Research Organizations:
Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95737600; ISBN 951-38-4339-4; TRN: FI9503062
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
80 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Hepola, J. Usability of catalytic gas cleaning in a simplified IGCC power system. Deactivation of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Literature review. Finland: N. p., 1993. Web.
Hepola, J. Usability of catalytic gas cleaning in a simplified IGCC power system. Deactivation of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Literature review. Finland.
Hepola, J. 1993. "Usability of catalytic gas cleaning in a simplified IGCC power system. Deactivation of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Literature review." Finland.
@misc{etde_10115096,
title = {Usability of catalytic gas cleaning in a simplified IGCC power system. Deactivation of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Literature review}
author = {Hepola, J}
abstractNote = {Nickel-based catalysts have proven to be efficient for tar and ammonia decomposition in laboratory scale gas purification experiments, in which biomass, peat and coal gasification was applied. A potential location for a separate catalyst reactor for an IGCC process using biomass gas derived from a fluidized-bed gasifier is downstream of cyclones before the ceramic filter unit. Complex nature of biomass and peat gas cannot be simulated completely in the laboratory. Long-term tests using a gas stream from an operating gasifier are likely the best way to test catalyst deactivation. Catalyst deactivation may be chemical, mechanical or thermal. Poisoning, fouling, thermal degradation and vaporization are the four intrinsic mechanisms. Poisoning and thermal degradation are generally slow and irreversible; fouling with coke and carbon is rapid but easily reversed by gasification. Loss of metals by vaporization is completely irreversible. Deactivation is more easily prevented than cured. Poisoning by impurities may be prevented by purifying the reactants. Carbon deposition and coking may be prevented by minimizing formation of precursors and by manipulating mass-transfer regimes to minimize the effect of carbon or coke on activity. Sintering is avoided by operating at a low temperature. The catalyst should also have a sufficient mechanical strength so that it does not dust or crack while in operation. Thermodynamic calculations showed that in the process conditions likely to be used in the catalytic cleaning unit, nickel oxide is reduced to metallic nickel, carbon (graphite) and nickel sulphide is formed depending on the temperature, pressure and the gas composition of the process. The higher the pressure the more probable is the formation of carbon and nickel sulphide. The probability for carbon formation decreases when the moisture content of the gas increases}
place = {Finland}
year = {1993}
month = {Dec}
}