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Availability analysis of a 100 kWh superconducting magnetic energy storage

Technical Report:

Abstract

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is one of the possible and useful applications of the modern superconducting technology. It is known that some loads on electricity distribution networks are particularly sensitive to short power interruptions and voltage sags. Different ranges of SMES applications have been widely discussed for large scale units (1 MWh - 1 GWh) as well as for small and medium scale units (1 kWh - 1 MWh). The major components of a SMES system are the superconducting magnet winding, the cryogenic refrigeration system and the power conditioning system, which interfaces the coil to the utility grid and applied load. The SMES winding is cooled by a cryogenic coolant: liquid helium for LTS (low temperature superconductor) wires; gaseous helium, liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen for HTS (high temperature superconductor) wires. In addition the higher operating temperature of HTS materials means also higher refrigeration efficiencies, greater realibility and easier acceptance within the utility community. It has been estimated that applying HTS materials in a SMES system will reduce the capital costs some 14-26 %. In this calculation it has been assumed that the price of HTS material is equivivalent to that of LTS material. This report deals with the  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
TTKK/TST-2/94
Reference Number:
SCA: 250100; 665412; PA: FI-95:003083; EDB-95:028579; SN: 95001320435
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1994
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE; RELIABILITY; MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE EQUIPMENT; FAILURE MODE ANALYSIS; CRITICALITY; SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS; 250100; 665412; MAGNETIC; SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES
OSTI ID:
10115070
Research Organizations:
Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Electricity and Magnetism
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95737621; ISBN 951-722-147-9; TRN: FI9503083
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
87 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Maekinen, H, and Mikkonen, R. Availability analysis of a 100 kWh superconducting magnetic energy storage. Finland: N. p., 1994. Web.
Maekinen, H, & Mikkonen, R. Availability analysis of a 100 kWh superconducting magnetic energy storage. Finland.
Maekinen, H, and Mikkonen, R. 1994. "Availability analysis of a 100 kWh superconducting magnetic energy storage." Finland.
@misc{etde_10115070,
title = {Availability analysis of a 100 kWh superconducting magnetic energy storage}
author = {Maekinen, H, and Mikkonen, R}
abstractNote = {Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is one of the possible and useful applications of the modern superconducting technology. It is known that some loads on electricity distribution networks are particularly sensitive to short power interruptions and voltage sags. Different ranges of SMES applications have been widely discussed for large scale units (1 MWh - 1 GWh) as well as for small and medium scale units (1 kWh - 1 MWh). The major components of a SMES system are the superconducting magnet winding, the cryogenic refrigeration system and the power conditioning system, which interfaces the coil to the utility grid and applied load. The SMES winding is cooled by a cryogenic coolant: liquid helium for LTS (low temperature superconductor) wires; gaseous helium, liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen for HTS (high temperature superconductor) wires. In addition the higher operating temperature of HTS materials means also higher refrigeration efficiencies, greater realibility and easier acceptance within the utility community. It has been estimated that applying HTS materials in a SMES system will reduce the capital costs some 14-26 %. In this calculation it has been assumed that the price of HTS material is equivivalent to that of LTS material. This report deals with the availability aspects of a 100 kWh SMES. A conceptual design of a reference unit has been used as a basis of the study. Therefore the lack of the detailed design leads to uncertainty in evaluating the failure data for single components. The failure rate data are mainly adopted from fusion data sources. This extrapolation is problematic but in most cases the only way to get results at all. The method used is based on the failure modes, effects and criticality analysis, FMECA. Fault trees describe the outage logic based on the functional analysis. Event trees clarify the consequences of the primary events and the criticality of these consequences are expressed as system down times}
place = {Finland}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}