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Turbine/vacuum pump installation. A demonstration at Thomas Tait and Sons, Inverurie (GB)

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

In 1986, Thomas Tait and Sons commissioned and started a new high-capacity twin-wire fine-paper machine PM4. At the design stage, the requirements for electrical power, process drying steam and paper machine vacuum were reviewed to produce a design which would minimise energy consumption and cost. A novel configuration was chosen for mechanically driving the paper machine vacuum pumps with a steam turbine and lineshaft. Low-pressure steam exhausted from the turbine could then be used for process drying. Since the cost of steam production for these requirements was lower than the cost of purchased electricity, considerable energy cost savings were anticipated. At the time, low energy water-ring vacuum pumps of a new design, the type 904, had just been introduced by the Nash Engineering Company. The 904 pump was selected using a nine pump configuration where, by using larger size pumps operating at lower rotor speeds, power consumption would be minimised while still operating with a stable water ring. Economic comparisons between the various combinations of the equipment installed are presented. The turbine drive configuration has proved to be reliable and easy to operate with minimum maintenance requirements and cost. The key to cost-effective operation is a demand for both mechanical  More>>
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1990
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
GB-402; NP-8
Reference Number:
SCA: 320303; PA: GB-91:052669; SN: 92000649671
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: New Practice final report produced under the Best Practice programme for the for the Energy Technology Support Unit, Harwell (GB).; PBD: Sep 1990
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; VACUUM PUMPS; STEAM TURBINES; PAPER INDUSTRY; DEMONSTRATION PLANTS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ECONOMICS; 320303; EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES
OSTI ID:
10115055
Research Organizations:
Department of Energy, London (United Kingdom). Energy Efficiency Office; Robert Gordon`s Inst. of Tech., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92761615; TRN: GB9152669
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only)
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
32 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

None. Turbine/vacuum pump installation. A demonstration at Thomas Tait and Sons, Inverurie (GB). United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web.
None. Turbine/vacuum pump installation. A demonstration at Thomas Tait and Sons, Inverurie (GB). United Kingdom.
None. 1990. "Turbine/vacuum pump installation. A demonstration at Thomas Tait and Sons, Inverurie (GB)." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_10115055,
title = {Turbine/vacuum pump installation. A demonstration at Thomas Tait and Sons, Inverurie (GB)}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {In 1986, Thomas Tait and Sons commissioned and started a new high-capacity twin-wire fine-paper machine PM4. At the design stage, the requirements for electrical power, process drying steam and paper machine vacuum were reviewed to produce a design which would minimise energy consumption and cost. A novel configuration was chosen for mechanically driving the paper machine vacuum pumps with a steam turbine and lineshaft. Low-pressure steam exhausted from the turbine could then be used for process drying. Since the cost of steam production for these requirements was lower than the cost of purchased electricity, considerable energy cost savings were anticipated. At the time, low energy water-ring vacuum pumps of a new design, the type 904, had just been introduced by the Nash Engineering Company. The 904 pump was selected using a nine pump configuration where, by using larger size pumps operating at lower rotor speeds, power consumption would be minimised while still operating with a stable water ring. Economic comparisons between the various combinations of the equipment installed are presented. The turbine drive configuration has proved to be reliable and easy to operate with minimum maintenance requirements and cost. The key to cost-effective operation is a demand for both mechanical power and low-pressure steam for process usage. If these combined requirements occur in order mill extension projects, serious consideration should be directed to the long-term energy savings that can be achieved with this arrangement. (author).}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Sep}
}