You need JavaScript to view this

Structural investigation of xenon ion-beam-irradiated glassy carbon

Technical Report:

Abstract

Raman spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy have been used to monitor the ion beam induced transformation in glassy carbon irradiated with 320 keV xenon ions to doses between 5 x 10{sup {sup 1}}2 and 6 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. It was found that the ion beam amorphizes the glassy carbon structure, the amorphization is accompanied by a compaction of the glassy carbon from an initial density of 1.55 to 2.2 {+-} 0.2 g/cm{sup 3} and that approximately 15% of the graphite-like bonds in glassy carbon are converted to diamond-like bonds in the amorphization process. The transformation occurs in two distinct stages as a function of ion dose. For damage levels up to 0.2 dpa the effect of ion beam is to decrease the average graphitic crystallite size. Above 0.2 dpa, disorder in bond length and bond angle away from ideal graphitic threefold coordination occurs leading to complete amorphization at high doses. The amorphization, compaction and presence of approximative 15% sp{sup 3} bonds in the implanted layer of glassy carbon results in surface layer which is significantly more resistant to abrasion than as-grown glassy carbon. 36 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.
Authors:
McCulloch, D G; [1]  Prawer, S; [2]  Hoffman, A [3] 
  1. Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Materials Engineering
  2. Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
  3. Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
UM-P-94/52
Reference Number:
SCA: 665300; 360602; PA: AIX-26:019040; EDB-95:032993; SN: 95001330539
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1994]
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CARBON; ORDER-DISORDER TRANSFORMATIONS; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; AMORPHOUS STATE; ATOMIC DISPLACEMENTS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; GRAPHITIZATION; ION BEAMS; IRRADIATION; RAMAN SPECTRA; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; XENON IONS; 665300; 360602; INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BEAMS AND CONDENSED MATTER; STRUCTURE AND PHASE STUDIES
Sponsoring Organizations:
Australian Research Council, Canberra, ACT (Australia)
OSTI ID:
10113841
Research Organizations:
Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95616777; TRN: AU9414231019040
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
38 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

McCulloch, D G, Prawer, S, and Hoffman, A. Structural investigation of xenon ion-beam-irradiated glassy carbon. Australia: N. p., 1994. Web.
McCulloch, D G, Prawer, S, & Hoffman, A. Structural investigation of xenon ion-beam-irradiated glassy carbon. Australia.
McCulloch, D G, Prawer, S, and Hoffman, A. 1994. "Structural investigation of xenon ion-beam-irradiated glassy carbon." Australia.
@misc{etde_10113841,
title = {Structural investigation of xenon ion-beam-irradiated glassy carbon}
author = {McCulloch, D G, Prawer, S, and Hoffman, A}
abstractNote = {Raman spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy have been used to monitor the ion beam induced transformation in glassy carbon irradiated with 320 keV xenon ions to doses between 5 x 10{sup {sup 1}}2 and 6 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. It was found that the ion beam amorphizes the glassy carbon structure, the amorphization is accompanied by a compaction of the glassy carbon from an initial density of 1.55 to 2.2 {+-} 0.2 g/cm{sup 3} and that approximately 15% of the graphite-like bonds in glassy carbon are converted to diamond-like bonds in the amorphization process. The transformation occurs in two distinct stages as a function of ion dose. For damage levels up to 0.2 dpa the effect of ion beam is to decrease the average graphitic crystallite size. Above 0.2 dpa, disorder in bond length and bond angle away from ideal graphitic threefold coordination occurs leading to complete amorphization at high doses. The amorphization, compaction and presence of approximative 15% sp{sup 3} bonds in the implanted layer of glassy carbon results in surface layer which is significantly more resistant to abrasion than as-grown glassy carbon. 36 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}