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Ion implantation and thermal stress resistance of ceramics

Technical Report:

Abstract

Monocrystals of sapphire and magnesia together with glass samples have been subjected to ion implantation prior to thermal shock testing in a plasma of continuously varied intensity. Measurements of the gap between adjacent fragments have been used to estimate the surface temperature. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the surface layer are measured in ion implanted and unimplanted samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of ceramic samples by introducing damage, which makes crack initiation easier under thermal stresses in sapphire and magnesia crystals. The fracture threshold and maximum crack density are shifted towards the lower temperature range. Ion implanted MgO crystals show a ten fold increase in surface crack density. An increased crack density results in a decreased degree of damage characterised by the depth of crack penetration. The thermal stress resistance parameter of glass samples is increased at relatively small doses and decreased at higher doses. The results suggest that crack density and the degree of fracture damage in brittle ceramics operating under thermal shock conditions can be effectively controlled by ion implantation which provides crack initiating defects in the near-surface region. 22 refs., 8 figs.
Authors:
Gurarie, V N; [1]  Wiliams, J S; Watt, A J [2] 
  1. Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
  2. Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
UM-P-93/93
Reference Number:
SCA: 360206; 665300; PA: AIX-26:015150; EDB-95:029641; SN: 95001328950
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1994]
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CERAMICS; ION IMPLANTATION; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; THERMAL STRESSES; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; MAGNESIUM OXIDES; SAPPHIRE; SURFACE PROPERTIES; THERMAL FRACTURES; THERMAL SHOCK; 360206; 665300; RADIATION EFFECTS; INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BEAMS AND CONDENSED MATTER
OSTI ID:
10113599
Research Organizations:
Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95615349; TRN: AU9414209015150
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
15 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Gurarie, V N, Wiliams, J S, and Watt, A J. Ion implantation and thermal stress resistance of ceramics. Australia: N. p., 1994. Web.
Gurarie, V N, Wiliams, J S, & Watt, A J. Ion implantation and thermal stress resistance of ceramics. Australia.
Gurarie, V N, Wiliams, J S, and Watt, A J. 1994. "Ion implantation and thermal stress resistance of ceramics." Australia.
@misc{etde_10113599,
title = {Ion implantation and thermal stress resistance of ceramics}
author = {Gurarie, V N, Wiliams, J S, and Watt, A J}
abstractNote = {Monocrystals of sapphire and magnesia together with glass samples have been subjected to ion implantation prior to thermal shock testing in a plasma of continuously varied intensity. Measurements of the gap between adjacent fragments have been used to estimate the surface temperature. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the surface layer are measured in ion implanted and unimplanted samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of ceramic samples by introducing damage, which makes crack initiation easier under thermal stresses in sapphire and magnesia crystals. The fracture threshold and maximum crack density are shifted towards the lower temperature range. Ion implanted MgO crystals show a ten fold increase in surface crack density. An increased crack density results in a decreased degree of damage characterised by the depth of crack penetration. The thermal stress resistance parameter of glass samples is increased at relatively small doses and decreased at higher doses. The results suggest that crack density and the degree of fracture damage in brittle ceramics operating under thermal shock conditions can be effectively controlled by ion implantation which provides crack initiating defects in the near-surface region. 22 refs., 8 figs.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}