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Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes

Technical Report:

Abstract

Aqueous waste effluents from nuclear fuel processing operations may contain trace quantities of heavy metals such as uranium. Conventional treatment of waste waters may be ineffective or expensive when uranium concentrations in the waste water must be reduced down to l {mu}g/ml or less. The ability of some microorganisms to uptake or adsorb dissolved heavy metals offers a promising alternative method for waste treatment. The adsorption of uranium by Rhodobacter capsulata DSM 1710 and by Rhodospirillum rubrum DSM 467, two strains of photosynthetic bacteria, was examined to identify factors that might affect processes for the removal of uranium from aqueous solution. The optimal pH of uranium biosorption was 4.5 for both strains. Temperature had little or no effect on the process since more than 95 % of dissolved uranium was adsorbed to the bacterial biomass within 10 minutes after mixing of cell biomass at 25, 30, and 40 deg C, in case of Rb. capsulata. On the other hand the uranium adsorption by Rs. rubrum was affected by temperature showing much higher activity at 40 deg C than at 25 deg C. The maximum capacity of uranium adsorption by Rb. capsulata and Rs. rubrum was 248 and 228 {mu}g U/mg-dry  More>>
Authors:
Lee, Kang Suk; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kug Chan; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Park, Hyo Kook; Kim, Jin Kyu [1] 
  1. Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1991
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
KAERI/RR-945/90
Reference Number:
SCA: 052001; 050500; PA: AIX-23:015171; SN: 92000646983
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1991
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; WASTE PROCESSING; BACTERIA; BIOADSORBENTS; CALCIUM IONS; DESORPTION; POLLUTANTS; URANIUM; URANYL NITRATES; 052001; 050500; URANIUM ENRICHMENT
OSTI ID:
10113249
Research Organizations:
Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)
Country of Origin:
Korea, Republic of
Language:
Korean
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92615149; TRN: KR9100103015171
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
49 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Lee, Kang Suk, Chun, Ki Jung, Kim, Kug Chan, Choi, Yong Ho, Kim, In Gyu, Park, Hyo Kook, and Kim, Jin Kyu. Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes. Korea, Republic of: N. p., 1991. Web.
Lee, Kang Suk, Chun, Ki Jung, Kim, Kug Chan, Choi, Yong Ho, Kim, In Gyu, Park, Hyo Kook, & Kim, Jin Kyu. Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes. Korea, Republic of.
Lee, Kang Suk, Chun, Ki Jung, Kim, Kug Chan, Choi, Yong Ho, Kim, In Gyu, Park, Hyo Kook, and Kim, Jin Kyu. 1991. "Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes." Korea, Republic of.
@misc{etde_10113249,
title = {Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes}
author = {Lee, Kang Suk, Chun, Ki Jung, Kim, Kug Chan, Choi, Yong Ho, Kim, In Gyu, Park, Hyo Kook, and Kim, Jin Kyu}
abstractNote = {Aqueous waste effluents from nuclear fuel processing operations may contain trace quantities of heavy metals such as uranium. Conventional treatment of waste waters may be ineffective or expensive when uranium concentrations in the waste water must be reduced down to l {mu}g/ml or less. The ability of some microorganisms to uptake or adsorb dissolved heavy metals offers a promising alternative method for waste treatment. The adsorption of uranium by Rhodobacter capsulata DSM 1710 and by Rhodospirillum rubrum DSM 467, two strains of photosynthetic bacteria, was examined to identify factors that might affect processes for the removal of uranium from aqueous solution. The optimal pH of uranium biosorption was 4.5 for both strains. Temperature had little or no effect on the process since more than 95 % of dissolved uranium was adsorbed to the bacterial biomass within 10 minutes after mixing of cell biomass at 25, 30, and 40 deg C, in case of Rb. capsulata. On the other hand the uranium adsorption by Rs. rubrum was affected by temperature showing much higher activity at 40 deg C than at 25 deg C. The maximum capacity of uranium adsorption by Rb. capsulata and Rs. rubrum was 248 and 228 {mu}g U/mg-dry biomass, respectively. Such values are the highest among the reported so far in relation to microbial biosorptive removal of uranium. Furthermore the used cells could be regenerated as reusable sorbents for several times by washing the cell-bearing uranium with sodium bicarbonate solution. In conclusion, this kind of treatment of aqueous wastes can provided a promising alternative to existing methods in that the results of our study can be applied properly to the decontamination or recovery of certain pollutants and/or valuable elements from aqueous wastes. (Author).}
place = {Korea, Republic of}
year = {1991}
month = {Jan}
}