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Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource. Phase 2. Application of the methodology

Technical Report:

Abstract

This report presents the results of the second phase of a programme to estimate the UK wind energy resource. The overall objective of the programme is to provide quantitative resource estimates using a mesoscale (resolution about 1km) numerical model for the prediction of wind flow over complex terrain, in conjunction with digitised terrain data and wind data from surface meteorological stations. A network of suitable meteorological stations has been established and long term wind data obtained. Digitised terrain data for the whole UK were obtained, and wind flow modelling using the NOABL computer program has been performed. Maps of extractable wind power have been derived for various assumptions about wind turbine characteristics. Validation of the methodology indicates that the results are internally consistent, and in good agreement with available comparison data. Existing isovent maps, based on standard meteorological data which take no account of terrain effects, indicate that 10m annual mean wind speeds vary between about 4.5 and 7 m/s over the UK with only a few coastal areas over 6 m/s. The present study indicates that 28% of the UK land area had speeds over 6 m/s, with many hill sites having 10m speeds over 10 m/s. It is  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ETSU-WN-7054
Reference Number:
SCA: 170100; PA: GB-93:053193; EDB-94:012170; NTS-94:007875; ERA-19:003468; SN: 93001112919
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1992
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; UNITED KINGDOM; WIND POWER; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; N CODES; VALIDATION; MAPS; WIND; VELOCITY; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; DATA PROCESSING; COMPLEX TERRAIN; FLOW MODELS; 170100; RESOURCES AND AVAILABILITY (CLIMATOLOGY)
Sponsoring Organizations:
AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom)
OSTI ID:
10111864
Research Organizations:
UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Materials Physics and Metallurgy Div.
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE94725282; TRN: GB9353193
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only)
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
76 p.
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Burch, S F, Makari, M, Newton, K, Ravenscroft, F, and Whittaker, J. Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource. Phase 2. Application of the methodology. United Kingdom: N. p., 1992. Web.
Burch, S F, Makari, M, Newton, K, Ravenscroft, F, & Whittaker, J. Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource. Phase 2. Application of the methodology. United Kingdom.
Burch, S F, Makari, M, Newton, K, Ravenscroft, F, and Whittaker, J. 1992. "Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource. Phase 2. Application of the methodology." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_10111864,
title = {Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource. Phase 2. Application of the methodology}
author = {Burch, S F, Makari, M, Newton, K, Ravenscroft, F, and Whittaker, J}
abstractNote = {This report presents the results of the second phase of a programme to estimate the UK wind energy resource. The overall objective of the programme is to provide quantitative resource estimates using a mesoscale (resolution about 1km) numerical model for the prediction of wind flow over complex terrain, in conjunction with digitised terrain data and wind data from surface meteorological stations. A network of suitable meteorological stations has been established and long term wind data obtained. Digitised terrain data for the whole UK were obtained, and wind flow modelling using the NOABL computer program has been performed. Maps of extractable wind power have been derived for various assumptions about wind turbine characteristics. Validation of the methodology indicates that the results are internally consistent, and in good agreement with available comparison data. Existing isovent maps, based on standard meteorological data which take no account of terrain effects, indicate that 10m annual mean wind speeds vary between about 4.5 and 7 m/s over the UK with only a few coastal areas over 6 m/s. The present study indicates that 28% of the UK land area had speeds over 6 m/s, with many hill sites having 10m speeds over 10 m/s. It is concluded that these `first order` resource estimates represent a substantial improvement over the presently available `zero order` estimates. The results will be useful for broad resource studies and initial site screening. Detailed resource evaluation for local sites will require more detailed local modelling or ideally long term field measurements. (12 figures, 14 tables, 21 references). (Author)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}