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Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource: UK wind speed data package and user manual

Technical Report:

Abstract

A software package has been developed for IBM-PC or true compatibles. It is designed to provide easy access to the results of a programme of work to estimate the UK wind energy resource. Mean wind speed maps and quantitative resource estimates were obtained using the NOABL mesoscale (1 km resolution) numerical model for the prediction of wind flow over complex terrain. NOABL was used in conjunction with digitised terrain data and wind data from surface meteorological stations for a ten year period (1975-1984) to provide digital UK maps of mean wind speed at 10m, 25m and 45m above ground level. Also included in the derivation of these maps was the use of the Engineering Science Data Unit (ESDU) method to model the effect on wind speed of the abrupt change in surface roughness that occurs at the coast. With the wind speed software package, the user is able to obtain a display of the modelled wind speed at 10m, 25m and 45m above ground level for any location in the UK. The required co-ordinates are simply supplied by the user, and the package displays the selected wind speed. This user manual summarises the methodology used in the generation of these  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ETSU-WN-7056
Reference Number:
SCA: 170100; PA: GB-93:053191; EDB-94:012168; NTS-94:007873; ERA-19:003470; SN: 93001112917
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1992
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; UNITED KINGDOM; WIND POWER; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; WIND; VELOCITY; MAPS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; N CODES; FLOW MODELS; COMPLEX TERRAIN; 170100; RESOURCES AND AVAILABILITY (CLIMATOLOGY)
Sponsoring Organizations:
AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom)
OSTI ID:
10111858
Research Organizations:
AEA Industrial Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE94725280; TRN: GB9353191
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only)
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
54 p.
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Burch, S F, and Ravenscroft, F. Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource: UK wind speed data package and user manual. United Kingdom: N. p., 1992. Web.
Burch, S F, & Ravenscroft, F. Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource: UK wind speed data package and user manual. United Kingdom.
Burch, S F, and Ravenscroft, F. 1992. "Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource: UK wind speed data package and user manual." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_10111858,
title = {Computer modelling of the UK wind energy resource: UK wind speed data package and user manual}
author = {Burch, S F, and Ravenscroft, F}
abstractNote = {A software package has been developed for IBM-PC or true compatibles. It is designed to provide easy access to the results of a programme of work to estimate the UK wind energy resource. Mean wind speed maps and quantitative resource estimates were obtained using the NOABL mesoscale (1 km resolution) numerical model for the prediction of wind flow over complex terrain. NOABL was used in conjunction with digitised terrain data and wind data from surface meteorological stations for a ten year period (1975-1984) to provide digital UK maps of mean wind speed at 10m, 25m and 45m above ground level. Also included in the derivation of these maps was the use of the Engineering Science Data Unit (ESDU) method to model the effect on wind speed of the abrupt change in surface roughness that occurs at the coast. With the wind speed software package, the user is able to obtain a display of the modelled wind speed at 10m, 25m and 45m above ground level for any location in the UK. The required co-ordinates are simply supplied by the user, and the package displays the selected wind speed. This user manual summarises the methodology used in the generation of these UK maps and shows computer generated plots of the 25m wind speeds in 200 x 200 km regions covering the whole UK. The uncertainties inherent in the derivation of these maps are also described, and notes given on their practical usage. The present study indicated that 23% of the UK land area had speeds over 6 m/s, with many hill sites having 10m speeds over 10 m/s. It is concluded that these `first order` resource estimates represent a substantial improvement over the presently available `zero order` estimates. (18 figures, 3 tables, 6 references). (author)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}