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Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco)

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

The Treaty of Tlatelolco enhances the security of the countries of the region by reducing the risk of a nuclear-arms race among them, with all the danger and cost that it would entail, and, as a contribution to the world-wide nuclear non-proliferation regime, it constitutes an important confidence-building measure by ensuring, through its control and verification system, that parties to the Treaty do not posses and will not acquire nuclear weapons. List of parties to the Treaty of Tlatelolco as of 31 July 1989: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil (not full party), Chile (not full party), Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela. (Argentina and Dominica have signed the Treaty).
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1989
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-mf-13046
Reference Number:
SCA: 350101; PA: AIX-23:012756; SN: 92000638655
Resource Relation:
Journal Issue: No. 68; Other Information: DN: Published in the official languages of the United Nations.; PBD: Sep 1989; Related Information: Disarmament facts
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; TLATELOLCO TREATY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; SAFEGUARD REGULATIONS; 350101; TREATIES
OSTI ID:
10111829
Research Organizations:
United Nations, New York, NY (USA). Dept. for Disarmament Affairs
Country of Origin:
UN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92614098; TRN: XU9100019012756
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
15 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

None. Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco). UN: N. p., 1989. Web.
None. Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco). UN.
None. 1989. "Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco)." UN.
@misc{etde_10111829,
title = {Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco)}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {The Treaty of Tlatelolco enhances the security of the countries of the region by reducing the risk of a nuclear-arms race among them, with all the danger and cost that it would entail, and, as a contribution to the world-wide nuclear non-proliferation regime, it constitutes an important confidence-building measure by ensuring, through its control and verification system, that parties to the Treaty do not posses and will not acquire nuclear weapons. List of parties to the Treaty of Tlatelolco as of 31 July 1989: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil (not full party), Chile (not full party), Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela. (Argentina and Dominica have signed the Treaty).}
issue = {No. 68}
place = {UN}
year = {1989}
month = {Sep}
}