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Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel

Technical Report:

Abstract

Uraninite is a natural analogue for spent nuclear fuel because of similarities in structure and chemistry. Effective assessment of the long-term behavior of spent fuel in a geologic repository requires a knowledge of the corrosion products produced in that environment. Several important natural analogue sites are reviewed, illustrating a wide variety of environments from oxidizing to reducing, including, among others: Cigar Lake, Canada, a uraninite-bearing ore body at depth within a strictly reducing environment; the ore body has `seen` extensive groundwater interaction with virtually no significant oxidation or mobilization of U apperent. Koongara, Australia is a highly altered uraninite-bearing ore body partially exposed to meteoric water; alteration at depth has resulted from interaction with groundwater having a somewhat reduced Eh compared to the surface. Uraninite, Pb-uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates control U solubility at depth; uranyl phosphates and U adsorption onto clays and FeMn-oxides control U solubility near the surface. Pocos de Caldas, Brazil displays a redox from moving through uraninite-bearing rocks near the surface and shows local remobilization of U. Oklo, Gabon, a uraninite- and coffinite-bearing ore body, locally affected by intense hydrothermal alteration during fission reactions, demonstrates restricted radionuclide and fission product transport within a reducing environment.  More>>
Authors:
Finch, R; Ewing, R [1] 
  1. Dept. of Geology, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1990
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SKB-TR-91-15
Reference Number:
SCA: 400201; 052002; PA: AIX-23:010581; SN: 92000637556
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Dec 1990
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; URANINITES; URANIUM COMPOUNDS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; GEOCHEMISTRY; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL; 400201; 052002; CHEMICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES; WASTE DISPOSAL AND STORAGE
OSTI ID:
10111317
Research Organizations:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92613325; TRN: SE9100243010581
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
SWDN
Size:
138 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Finch, R, and Ewing, R. Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Sweden: N. p., 1990. Web.
Finch, R, & Ewing, R. Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Sweden.
Finch, R, and Ewing, R. 1990. "Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel." Sweden.
@misc{etde_10111317,
title = {Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel}
author = {Finch, R, and Ewing, R}
abstractNote = {Uraninite is a natural analogue for spent nuclear fuel because of similarities in structure and chemistry. Effective assessment of the long-term behavior of spent fuel in a geologic repository requires a knowledge of the corrosion products produced in that environment. Several important natural analogue sites are reviewed, illustrating a wide variety of environments from oxidizing to reducing, including, among others: Cigar Lake, Canada, a uraninite-bearing ore body at depth within a strictly reducing environment; the ore body has `seen` extensive groundwater interaction with virtually no significant oxidation or mobilization of U apperent. Koongara, Australia is a highly altered uraninite-bearing ore body partially exposed to meteoric water; alteration at depth has resulted from interaction with groundwater having a somewhat reduced Eh compared to the surface. Uraninite, Pb-uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates control U solubility at depth; uranyl phosphates and U adsorption onto clays and FeMn-oxides control U solubility near the surface. Pocos de Caldas, Brazil displays a redox from moving through uraninite-bearing rocks near the surface and shows local remobilization of U. Oklo, Gabon, a uraninite- and coffinite-bearing ore body, locally affected by intense hydrothermal alteration during fission reactions, demonstrates restricted radionuclide and fission product transport within a reducing environment. A current study being conducted by the authors at Shinkolbwe, Zaire, a uraninite-bearing ore body exposed to highly oxidizing conditions at the surface, provides over 50 species of uranyl phases for detailed study, and illustrates a complex uranyl phase paragenesis over several million years, from earliest-formed uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates to later-formed uranyl phosphate. (au) (268 refs.).}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1990}
month = {Dec}
}