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Radiological hazard assessment at the Monte Bello Islands

Technical Report:

Abstract

Field and laboratory measurements are described and data presented which enabled dose assessments for exposure to artificial radionuclides at the Monte Bello Islands, the sites of U.K. atomic weapons tests in 1952 and 1956. The report focuses on quantifying the inhalation hazard as exposure via the ingestion and wound contamination pathways is considered inconsequential. Surface soil concentrations of radionuclides and particle size analyses are presented for various sampling sites. Analyses of the distribution with depth indicated that, in general, the activity is more or less uniformly mixed through the top 40 mm, although in a few cases the top 10 mm contains the bulk of the activity. The{sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am activity ratios were measured for selected samples. The only potential hazards to health from residual radioactive contamination on the Monte Bello Islands are due to the inhalation of actinides (specifically plutonium and americium) and from the external gamma-radiation field. Only one area, in the fallout plume of HURRICANE to the north-west of Main Beach, is a potential inhalation hazard. For an average inhalable dust loading of 0.1 mg/m{sup 3}, three days occupancy of the most contaminated site will result in a committed effective dose equivalent of 1 mSv. The two  More>>
Authors:
Cooper, M B; Martin, L J; Wilks, M J; Wiliams, G A [1] 
  1. Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1990
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ARL-TR-096
Reference Number:
SCA: 560101; PA: AIX-25:002764; EDB-94:015325; ERA-19:005362; NTS-94:014058; SN: 93001120299
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Dec 1990
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CONTAMINATION; DUSTS; INHALATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; ACTIVITY LEVELS; AMERICIUM 241; COMPILED DATA; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; ISLANDS; LOCAL FALLOUT; PLUTONIUM 239; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIOASSAY; WESTERN AUSTRALIA; 560101; DOSIMETRY AND MONITORING
OSTI ID:
10109566
Research Organizations:
Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE94608994; TRN: AU9313500002764
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
41 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Cooper, M B, Martin, L J, Wilks, M J, and Wiliams, G A. Radiological hazard assessment at the Monte Bello Islands. Australia: N. p., 1990. Web.
Cooper, M B, Martin, L J, Wilks, M J, & Wiliams, G A. Radiological hazard assessment at the Monte Bello Islands. Australia.
Cooper, M B, Martin, L J, Wilks, M J, and Wiliams, G A. 1990. "Radiological hazard assessment at the Monte Bello Islands." Australia.
@misc{etde_10109566,
title = {Radiological hazard assessment at the Monte Bello Islands}
author = {Cooper, M B, Martin, L J, Wilks, M J, and Wiliams, G A}
abstractNote = {Field and laboratory measurements are described and data presented which enabled dose assessments for exposure to artificial radionuclides at the Monte Bello Islands, the sites of U.K. atomic weapons tests in 1952 and 1956. The report focuses on quantifying the inhalation hazard as exposure via the ingestion and wound contamination pathways is considered inconsequential. Surface soil concentrations of radionuclides and particle size analyses are presented for various sampling sites. Analyses of the distribution with depth indicated that, in general, the activity is more or less uniformly mixed through the top 40 mm, although in a few cases the top 10 mm contains the bulk of the activity. The{sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am activity ratios were measured for selected samples. The only potential hazards to health from residual radioactive contamination on the Monte Bello Islands are due to the inhalation of actinides (specifically plutonium and americium) and from the external gamma-radiation field. Only one area, in the fallout plume of HURRICANE to the north-west of Main Beach, is a potential inhalation hazard. For an average inhalable dust loading of 0.1 mg/m{sup 3}, three days occupancy of the most contaminated site will result in a committed effective dose equivalent of 1 mSv. The two ground zeros could not be considered inhalation hazards, considering the small areas concerned and the habits of visitors (full-time occupancy, over a period of one year or more, of the most contaminated sites at either of the G1 or G2 ground zeros would be required to reach 1 mSv). 25 refs., 23 tabs., 3 figs.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1990}
month = {Dec}
}