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Model for cryogenic particle detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers

Technical Report:

Abstract

We present data on a detector composed of an 18 g Si crystal and a superconducting phase transition thermometer which could be operated over a wide temperature range. An energy resolution of 1 keV (FWHM) has been obtained for 60 keV photons. The signals consist of two components: A fast one and a slow one, with decay times of 1.5 ms and 30-60 ms, respectively. In this paper we present a simple model which takes thermal and non-thermal phonon processes into account and provides a description of the observed temperature dependence of the pulse shape. The fast component, which completely dominates the signal at low temperatures, is due to high-frequency non-thermal phonons being absorbed in the thermometer. Thermalization of these phonons then leads to a temperature rise of the absorber, which causes the slow thermal component. At the highest operating temperatures (T{approx}80 mK) the amplitude of the slow component is roughly as expected from the heat capacity of the absorber. The strong suppression of the slow component at low temperatures is explained mostly as a consequence of the weak thermal coupling between electrons and phonons in the thermometer at low temperatures. (orig.)
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
MPI-PhE-94-14
Reference Number:
SCA: 440101; PA: DEN-94:0FO244; EDB-95:024282; SN: 95001313330
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; SI SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS; SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES; X-RAY DETECTION; CRYOGENICS; KEV RANGE 10-100; PHONONS; PULSES; SILICON; SPECIFIC HEAT; SUPERCONDUCTIVITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; THERMALIZATION; THERMOMETERS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; ENERGY RESOLUTION; GAMMA DETECTION; CRYSTAL MODELS; RESPONSE FUNCTIONS; PULSE RISE TIME; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; STATISTICAL MODELS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0000-0013 K; 440101; GENERAL DETECTORS OR MONITORS AND RADIOMETRIC INSTRUMENTS
OSTI ID:
10107962
Research Organizations:
No corporate text available (Country unknown/Code not available)
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95731743; TRN: DE94FO244
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
DEN
Size:
32 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Proebst, F, Frank, M, Cooper, S, Colling, P, Dummer, D, Ferger, P, Nucciotti, A, Seidel, W, and Stodolsky, L. Model for cryogenic particle detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers. Germany: N. p., 1994. Web.
Proebst, F, Frank, M, Cooper, S, Colling, P, Dummer, D, Ferger, P, Nucciotti, A, Seidel, W, & Stodolsky, L. Model for cryogenic particle detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers. Germany.
Proebst, F, Frank, M, Cooper, S, Colling, P, Dummer, D, Ferger, P, Nucciotti, A, Seidel, W, and Stodolsky, L. 1994. "Model for cryogenic particle detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers." Germany.
@misc{etde_10107962,
title = {Model for cryogenic particle detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers}
author = {Proebst, F, Frank, M, Cooper, S, Colling, P, Dummer, D, Ferger, P, Nucciotti, A, Seidel, W, and Stodolsky, L}
abstractNote = {We present data on a detector composed of an 18 g Si crystal and a superconducting phase transition thermometer which could be operated over a wide temperature range. An energy resolution of 1 keV (FWHM) has been obtained for 60 keV photons. The signals consist of two components: A fast one and a slow one, with decay times of 1.5 ms and 30-60 ms, respectively. In this paper we present a simple model which takes thermal and non-thermal phonon processes into account and provides a description of the observed temperature dependence of the pulse shape. The fast component, which completely dominates the signal at low temperatures, is due to high-frequency non-thermal phonons being absorbed in the thermometer. Thermalization of these phonons then leads to a temperature rise of the absorber, which causes the slow thermal component. At the highest operating temperatures (T{approx}80 mK) the amplitude of the slow component is roughly as expected from the heat capacity of the absorber. The strong suppression of the slow component at low temperatures is explained mostly as a consequence of the weak thermal coupling between electrons and phonons in the thermometer at low temperatures. (orig.)}
place = {Germany}
year = {1994}
month = {Sep}
}