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Cold collisions of atoms and molecules

Technical Report:

Abstract

The first five chapters of this thesis are meant to serve as an introduction to the world of cold atoms and diatomic molecules. This is a vast area of research, and a rather 'hot topic' in modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. The presentation provided here is of course strongly biased by my own view of the field, and how I perceive that it ought to be introduced. In addition, the introduction should serve as a primer to the papers that represent the actual research undertaken by us during the last four years (August 2006 - March 2010). The introductory part is written at a level suitable for physics students working in other areas of physics. The first chapter should be readable for everyone with a basic knowledge of physics, while the later chapters could benefit from advance knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Chapter 1 introduces cold atoms, while chapter 2 introduces cold diatomic molecules and their quantum mechanical description. Cold collisions are treated in chapter 3. Chapters 4 and 5 introduce the work presented in the papers, and are meant to provide background information and motivations. However, we do not repeat the arguments or the conclusions presented in  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 15, 2010
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
No. 957
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Series of dissertations submitted to the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo; ISSN 1501-7710; Thesis or Dissertation; TH: Thesis (Ph.D); refs., figs., tabs
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOM COLLISIONS; BORN-OPPENHEIMER APPROXIMATION; ELASTIC SCATTERING; INELASTIC SCATTERING; FESHBACH-WEISSKOPF MODEL; EVAPORATIVE COOLING; COLD STORAGE; LEVINSON THEOREM; SCATTERING; BUFFERS; GASES
OSTI ID:
1010756
Research Organizations:
Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: NO1105123
Availability:
Available at: http://www.duo.uio.no/publ/fysikk/2010/103504/publ-dravh- Lysebo.pdf
Submitting Site:
NW
Size:
vp.
Announcement Date:
Apr 11, 2011

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Lysebo, Marius. Cold collisions of atoms and molecules. Norway: N. p., 2010. Web.
Lysebo, Marius. Cold collisions of atoms and molecules. Norway.
Lysebo, Marius. 2010. "Cold collisions of atoms and molecules." Norway.
@misc{etde_1010756,
title = {Cold collisions of atoms and molecules}
author = {Lysebo, Marius}
abstractNote = {The first five chapters of this thesis are meant to serve as an introduction to the world of cold atoms and diatomic molecules. This is a vast area of research, and a rather 'hot topic' in modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. The presentation provided here is of course strongly biased by my own view of the field, and how I perceive that it ought to be introduced. In addition, the introduction should serve as a primer to the papers that represent the actual research undertaken by us during the last four years (August 2006 - March 2010). The introductory part is written at a level suitable for physics students working in other areas of physics. The first chapter should be readable for everyone with a basic knowledge of physics, while the later chapters could benefit from advance knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Chapter 1 introduces cold atoms, while chapter 2 introduces cold diatomic molecules and their quantum mechanical description. Cold collisions are treated in chapter 3. Chapters 4 and 5 introduce the work presented in the papers, and are meant to provide background information and motivations. However, we do not repeat the arguments or the conclusions presented in these papers, we merely introduce the approach to the problem. Papers I and IV are related to chapter 4, whereas papers II and III are related to the material presented in chapter 5. The present work has relied heavily on numerical methods. Quite extensive programs have been developed from scratch in C/C++. However, the numerical methods and the algorithms have not been described in this thesis. The majority of the algorithms we have used are well tested and can be found in standard references. Some parts of the code are however not standard. This applies in particular to the implementation of various matrix elements, different molecular basis sets and the transformations between them, the incorporation of the Pauli principle and so on. Too many weekends have elapsed testing and debugging these codes, if time permits they may become available for everyone to modify or use in the future. At the present, the user interface is not friendly enough. As these codes merely combine known results, a more detailed description was not included in the papers, whereas such a description seems far to technical to be appropriate for the first part of this thesis. (AG)}
place = {Norway}
year = {2010}
month = {Mar}
}