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Forest fuel and carbon balances; Skogsbraensle och kolbalanser

Technical Report:

Abstract

Forest fuel, i.e., branches and tops that remain after felling, are not considered to give a net surplus of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. In order to, if possible, verify this theory a survey was made of the literature concerning different carbon flows related to forest fuel. Branches and needles that are not utilised as fuel nonetheless eventually become decomposed to carbon dioxide. Branches and stem wood are broken down in occasional cases to 60-80% already within 5-6 years but the decomposition rate varies strongly. A small amount of existing data suggest that branches and stems are broken down almost completely within 60-70 years, and earlier in some cases. Lignin is the component in needles and wood that is the most resistant to decomposition. Decomposition is favoured by optimal temperature and moisture, ground contact and ground animals. Material that is mulched during soil preparation is decomposed considerably faster than material that lies on the soil surface. Felling residues that are left on the soil are a large momentary addition to the soil`s reserves of organic material but after a number of years the difference in soil organic material is small between places where fuel has been removed and places where  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
VF-BIO-94-11
Reference Number:
SCA: 095000; PA: SWD-94:007504; EDB-95:013109; SN: 95001301706
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1994
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; FORESTRY; CARBON CYCLE; CARBON; BIOMASS; WOOD FUELS; WOOD WASTES; SOILS; FORESTS; BIODEGRADATION; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION; NUMERICAL DATA; 095000; ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS
OSTI ID:
10106363
Research Organizations:
Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Vaellingby (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
Swedish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1100-5130; Other: ON: DE95723968; CNN: Project Bioenergy-38402-03; TRN: SE9407504
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS; INIS
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
55 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Lundborg, A. Forest fuel and carbon balances; Skogsbraensle och kolbalanser. Sweden: N. p., 1994. Web.
Lundborg, A. Forest fuel and carbon balances; Skogsbraensle och kolbalanser. Sweden.
Lundborg, A. 1994. "Forest fuel and carbon balances; Skogsbraensle och kolbalanser." Sweden.
@misc{etde_10106363,
title = {Forest fuel and carbon balances; Skogsbraensle och kolbalanser}
author = {Lundborg, A}
abstractNote = {Forest fuel, i.e., branches and tops that remain after felling, are not considered to give a net surplus of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. In order to, if possible, verify this theory a survey was made of the literature concerning different carbon flows related to forest fuel. Branches and needles that are not utilised as fuel nonetheless eventually become decomposed to carbon dioxide. Branches and stem wood are broken down in occasional cases to 60-80% already within 5-6 years but the decomposition rate varies strongly. A small amount of existing data suggest that branches and stems are broken down almost completely within 60-70 years, and earlier in some cases. Lignin is the component in needles and wood that is the most resistant to decomposition. Decomposition is favoured by optimal temperature and moisture, ground contact and ground animals. Material that is mulched during soil preparation is decomposed considerably faster than material that lies on the soil surface. Felling residues that are left on the soil are a large momentary addition to the soil`s reserves of organic material but after a number of years the difference in soil organic material is small between places where fuel has been removed and places where felling residues have been left. High nitrogen deposition, fire control and effective forestry are factors that contribute to the increases in the reserves of soil organic material. It appears to be a good approximation to consider the forest fuel as being a neutral fuel as regards carbon dioxide in a longer perspective. In comparison with other biofuels and fossil fuels, forest fuel appears, together with Salix, to be the fuel that results in very little extra discharge of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases during its production, transport and processing. 70 refs, 5 figs, tabs}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1994}
month = {Oct}
}