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Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data

Technical Report:

Abstract

We develop a simple, globally uniform model of CO{sub 2} exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere by coupling the model with a three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model using observed winds, and checking results against observed concentrations of CO{sub 2} at various monitoring sites. CO{sub 2} fluxes are derived from observed greenness using satellite-derived Global Vegetation Index data, combined with observations of temperature, radiation, and precipitation. We explore a range of CO{sub 2} flux formulations together with some modifications of the modelled atmospheric transport. We find that while some formulations can be excluded, it cannot be decided whether or not to make CO{sub 2} uptake and release dependent on water stress. It appears that the seasonality of net CO{sub 2} fluxes in the tropics, which would be expected to be driven by water availability, is small and is therefore not visible in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The latter is dominated largely by northern temperate and boreal vegetation, where seasonality is mostly temperature determined. We find some evidence that there is still considerable CO{sub 2} release from soils during northern-hemisphere winter. An exponential air temperature dependence of soil release with a Q{sub 10} of 1.5 is found  More>>
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-mf-15073
Reference Number:
SCA: 540110; 540210; PA: DEN-94:0FN557; EDB-95:016926; SN: 95001306261
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Feb 1994
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON CYCLE; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; BIOSPHERE; CARBON DIOXIDE; REMOTE SENSING; PLANTS; LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT; SOILS; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; 540110; 540210; BASIC STUDIES
OSTI ID:
10106175
Research Organizations:
Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0937-1060; Other: ON: DE95726897; TRN: DE94FN557
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
DEN
Size:
26 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Knorr, W, and Heimann, M. Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data. Germany: N. p., 1994. Web.
Knorr, W, & Heimann, M. Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data. Germany.
Knorr, W, and Heimann, M. 1994. "Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data." Germany.
@misc{etde_10106175,
title = {Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data}
author = {Knorr, W, and Heimann, M}
abstractNote = {We develop a simple, globally uniform model of CO{sub 2} exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere by coupling the model with a three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model using observed winds, and checking results against observed concentrations of CO{sub 2} at various monitoring sites. CO{sub 2} fluxes are derived from observed greenness using satellite-derived Global Vegetation Index data, combined with observations of temperature, radiation, and precipitation. We explore a range of CO{sub 2} flux formulations together with some modifications of the modelled atmospheric transport. We find that while some formulations can be excluded, it cannot be decided whether or not to make CO{sub 2} uptake and release dependent on water stress. It appears that the seasonality of net CO{sub 2} fluxes in the tropics, which would be expected to be driven by water availability, is small and is therefore not visible in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The latter is dominated largely by northern temperate and boreal vegetation, where seasonality is mostly temperature determined. We find some evidence that there is still considerable CO{sub 2} release from soils during northern-hemisphere winter. An exponential air temperature dependence of soil release with a Q{sub 10} of 1.5 is found to be most appropriate, with no cutoff at low freezing temperatures. This result is independent of the year from which observed winds were taken. This is remarkable insofar as year-to-year changes in modelled CO{sub 2} concentrations caused by changes in the wind data clearly outweigh those caused by year-to-year variability in the climate and vegetation index data. (orig.)}
place = {Germany}
year = {1994}
month = {Feb}
}