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Daylight walls; Dagslysvaegge

Technical Report:

Abstract

Heat loss through external walls is proportional to the number of degree hours calculated, using the temperature difference from wall surface to wall surface. It was investigated to what extent transmission heat loss could be reduced by using opaque `daylight` walls, which are lightweight walls heavily insulated with opaque insulation materials with exterior transparent insulation (a single layer of glass or other transparent material).To enhance the use of direct and diffuse radiation the outer surface of the opaque wall is painted black. Temperatures on and through three glazed walls of a small test hut were monitored. Measured air and surface temperatures and weather data were used to calculate the number of degree hours for the opaque daylight walls and for traditional highly insulated walls. Energy savings and the consequences on indoor thermal comfort of using daylight walls were analyzed using the simulation programme tsbi3. A detached rectangular house was used as a model to be compared with a similar house with daylight walls. Energy savings were found as the difference in heating demands between the two houses and thermal comfort was analyzed in both houses. Measurements at the test hut showed that maximum reduction in degree hours was 35-75% at  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
DTU-LV-MEDD-265
Reference Number:
SCA: 140901; PA: DK-94:001743; EDB-95:013265; SN: 95001301485
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: EFP-84; PBD: Sep 1994
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS; WALLS; HEAT LOSSES; HOUSES; OPACITY; THERMAL COMFORT; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; SPACE HEATING; 140901; SPACE HEATING AND COOLING
OSTI ID:
10105199
Research Organizations:
Danmarks Tekniske Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Varmeisolering
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
Danish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE95723843; CNN: Contract EM-22411-401-05-01; TRN: DK9401743
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS
Submitting Site:
DK
Size:
45 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Boye-Hansen, L. Daylight walls; Dagslysvaegge. Denmark: N. p., 1994. Web.
Boye-Hansen, L. Daylight walls; Dagslysvaegge. Denmark.
Boye-Hansen, L. 1994. "Daylight walls; Dagslysvaegge." Denmark.
@misc{etde_10105199,
title = {Daylight walls; Dagslysvaegge}
author = {Boye-Hansen, L}
abstractNote = {Heat loss through external walls is proportional to the number of degree hours calculated, using the temperature difference from wall surface to wall surface. It was investigated to what extent transmission heat loss could be reduced by using opaque `daylight` walls, which are lightweight walls heavily insulated with opaque insulation materials with exterior transparent insulation (a single layer of glass or other transparent material).To enhance the use of direct and diffuse radiation the outer surface of the opaque wall is painted black. Temperatures on and through three glazed walls of a small test hut were monitored. Measured air and surface temperatures and weather data were used to calculate the number of degree hours for the opaque daylight walls and for traditional highly insulated walls. Energy savings and the consequences on indoor thermal comfort of using daylight walls were analyzed using the simulation programme tsbi3. A detached rectangular house was used as a model to be compared with a similar house with daylight walls. Energy savings were found as the difference in heating demands between the two houses and thermal comfort was analyzed in both houses. Measurements at the test hut showed that maximum reduction in degree hours was 35-75% at a south facing wall during sunny periods. In cloudy weather reduction was 8%. For the houses with daylight walls, monthly savings in heating energy was 3-31% and 3-79%. The analysis of thermal comfort showed no significant influence from the use of daylight walls. (AB)}
place = {Denmark}
year = {1994}
month = {Sep}
}