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Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials. A proposal under mechanism C to the ARC for the establishment of a state-of-the-art Australian facility for micron scale optical spectroscopic analysis of materials

Technical Report:

Abstract

The goal of this proposal is the establishment of a facility which will enable complete micron scale spectroscopic analysis of any sample which can be imaged in the optical microscope. Current applications include studies of carbon fibres, diamond thin films, ceramics (zirconia and high T{sub c} superconductors), semiconductors, wood pulp, wool fibres, mineral inclusions, proteins, plant cells, polymers, fluoride glasses, and optical fibres. The range of interests crosses traditional discipline boundaries and augurs well for a truly interdisciplinary collaboration. Developments in instrumentation such as confocal imaging are planned to achieve sub-micron resolution, and advances in computer software and hardware will enable the aforementioned spectroscopies to be used to map molecular and crystalline phases on the surfaces of materials. Coupled with existing compositional microprobes (e.g. the proton microprobe) the possibilities for the development of new, powerful, hybrid imaging technologies appear to be excellent.
Authors:
James, David; [1]  Finlayson, Trevor; [2]  Prawer, Steven [3] 
  1. Deakin Univ., Geelong, Vic. (Australia)
  2. Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia). Dept. of Physics
  3. Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia). School of Physics
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1991
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
UM-P-91/63
Reference Number:
SCA: 440101; PA: AIX-23:005741; SN: 91000616013
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1991]
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AUSTRALIAN ORGANIZATIONS; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; CERAMICS; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; IMAGES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; USES; 440101; GENERAL DETECTORS OR MONITORS AND RADIOMETRIC INSTRUMENTS
OSTI ID:
10102489
Research Organizations:
Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE92611968; TRN: AU9112348005741
Availability:
OSTI; NTIS (US Sales Only); INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
31 p.
Announcement Date:
Jun 30, 2005

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

James, David, Finlayson, Trevor, and Prawer, Steven. Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials. A proposal under mechanism C to the ARC for the establishment of a state-of-the-art Australian facility for micron scale optical spectroscopic analysis of materials. Australia: N. p., 1991. Web.
James, David, Finlayson, Trevor, & Prawer, Steven. Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials. A proposal under mechanism C to the ARC for the establishment of a state-of-the-art Australian facility for micron scale optical spectroscopic analysis of materials. Australia.
James, David, Finlayson, Trevor, and Prawer, Steven. 1991. "Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials. A proposal under mechanism C to the ARC for the establishment of a state-of-the-art Australian facility for micron scale optical spectroscopic analysis of materials." Australia.
@misc{etde_10102489,
title = {Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials. A proposal under mechanism C to the ARC for the establishment of a state-of-the-art Australian facility for micron scale optical spectroscopic analysis of materials}
author = {James, David, Finlayson, Trevor, and Prawer, Steven}
abstractNote = {The goal of this proposal is the establishment of a facility which will enable complete micron scale spectroscopic analysis of any sample which can be imaged in the optical microscope. Current applications include studies of carbon fibres, diamond thin films, ceramics (zirconia and high T{sub c} superconductors), semiconductors, wood pulp, wool fibres, mineral inclusions, proteins, plant cells, polymers, fluoride glasses, and optical fibres. The range of interests crosses traditional discipline boundaries and augurs well for a truly interdisciplinary collaboration. Developments in instrumentation such as confocal imaging are planned to achieve sub-micron resolution, and advances in computer software and hardware will enable the aforementioned spectroscopies to be used to map molecular and crystalline phases on the surfaces of materials. Coupled with existing compositional microprobes (e.g. the proton microprobe) the possibilities for the development of new, powerful, hybrid imaging technologies appear to be excellent.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1991}
month = {Dec}
}