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Access and use of electricity in the period 1993-2009; Tilgang og anvendelse av elektrisitet i perioden 1993-2009

Technical Report:

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to present and analyse the development of supply and consumption of electricity in the period 1993-2009 (Since some of the time series of electricity consumption are not available prior to 1993, we have chosen to consider the period 1993-2009.) In the Norwegian power market, supply of power is defined as the sum of domestic production and imports of electricity, while consumption equals exports and domestic consumption. Our data come primarily from the annual electricity statistics of Statistics Norway. For the year 2009 we also utilise data from the monthly electricity statistics and from the statistics of industrial energy use in Statistics Norway. During the period 1993-2009, almost the entire Norwegian power system was based on hydropower. Hydropower comprised 95.7 per cent of total electricity generation in 2009, while thermal and wind power amounted to 3.6 and 0.7 per cent, respectively. Compared with 1993, hydropower's share of total production fell by 3.9 percentage points, while the shares of thermal and wind power rose by 3.2 and 0.7 percentage points, respectively. In the period 1993-2009, Norway was a net exporter for 10 years and a net importer for 7 years. Net exports of electricity over the  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 2011
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SSB-R-2011-2
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Numerical Data
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; STATISTICAL DATA; ELECTRICITY; ELECTRIC POWER; HYDROELECTRIC POWER; DISPERSED STORAGE AND GENERATION; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; DEMAND FACTORS; ENERGY DEMAND; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; NORWAY
OSTI ID:
1009197
Research Organizations:
Statistisk Sentralbyraa. Oslo (Norway)
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
Norwegian
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0806-2056; TRN: NO1105080
Availability:
Available at: http://www.ssb.no/emner/10/08/10/rapp_201102/rapp_201102.pdf
Submitting Site:
NW
Size:
29 p. pages
Announcement Date:
Mar 21, 2011

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Holstad, Magne. Access and use of electricity in the period 1993-2009; Tilgang og anvendelse av elektrisitet i perioden 1993-2009. Norway: N. p., 2011. Web.
Holstad, Magne. Access and use of electricity in the period 1993-2009; Tilgang og anvendelse av elektrisitet i perioden 1993-2009. Norway.
Holstad, Magne. 2011. "Access and use of electricity in the period 1993-2009; Tilgang og anvendelse av elektrisitet i perioden 1993-2009." Norway.
@misc{etde_1009197,
title = {Access and use of electricity in the period 1993-2009; Tilgang og anvendelse av elektrisitet i perioden 1993-2009}
author = {Holstad, Magne}
abstractNote = {The purpose of this report is to present and analyse the development of supply and consumption of electricity in the period 1993-2009 (Since some of the time series of electricity consumption are not available prior to 1993, we have chosen to consider the period 1993-2009.) In the Norwegian power market, supply of power is defined as the sum of domestic production and imports of electricity, while consumption equals exports and domestic consumption. Our data come primarily from the annual electricity statistics of Statistics Norway. For the year 2009 we also utilise data from the monthly electricity statistics and from the statistics of industrial energy use in Statistics Norway. During the period 1993-2009, almost the entire Norwegian power system was based on hydropower. Hydropower comprised 95.7 per cent of total electricity generation in 2009, while thermal and wind power amounted to 3.6 and 0.7 per cent, respectively. Compared with 1993, hydropower's share of total production fell by 3.9 percentage points, while the shares of thermal and wind power rose by 3.2 and 0.7 percentage points, respectively. In the period 1993-2009, Norway was a net exporter for 10 years and a net importer for 7 years. Net exports of electricity over the entire period came to 50 TWh. From 1993 to 1999, Norway was a net exporter for 4 years and a net importer for 3 years, with total net exports of 0.2 TWh. Net exports for the period 2000-2009 were therefore considerably higher than for the earlier period. In the last part of the report, we discuss the development in electricity consumption of the following groups: (i) power-intensive manufacturing, (ii) mining, extraction and manufacturing excluding power-intensive manufacturing, (iii) construction and services and (iv) households and agriculture. It is common in studies of electricity consumption to analyse whether consumption becomes more efficient over time. When production, number of employees, number of households etc. increase, the need for electricity increases. However, electricity consumption can be made more efficient so that we utilise less electricity in proportion to relevant activity variables. For power-intensive manufacturing and mining, extraction and manufacturing excluding power-intensive manufacturing we divide the electricity consumption by production at constant prices in order to get a picture of the underlying development. While for construction and services and households the electricity consumption is measured in proportion to numbers of full-time equivalents and numbers of households, respectively. Electricity consumption measured in proportion to production at constant prices in power-intensive manufacturing fell from 397 MWh/NOK million in 1993 to 294 MWh/NOK million in 2007. One important reason for the decline in the power intensity was a change from Soederberg technology to more efficient pre baked technology in aluminium production. Electricity consumption measured in proportion to production at constant prices in mining, extraction and manufacturing excluding power-intensive manufacturing came to 26 MWh/NOK million in 1993, reducing to 16 MWh/NOK million in 2007. The drop in consumption per produced unit may be due to increased efficiency of machinery and electrical equipment during the period. Another reason for the drop may be that, in recent years, it has become more common in manufacturing to out source production. While electricity consumption per full-time equivalent (FTE) in construction and services went down from 16 GWh/1000 FTEs in 1993 to 14 GWh/1000 FTEs in 2009, electricity consumption per household fell from about 18,000 kWh in 1993 to 16,000 kWh in 2009. Increases in the real price of electricity since 2000 for the two groups may have stimulated electricity-saving measures such as better insulation of houses and less-energy-intensive equipment. (Author)}
place = {Norway}
year = {2011}
month = {Jan}
}