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Floating LNG and the environmental repercussions for stranded gas going forward; LNG report

Journal Article:

Abstract

Globally, oil still remains the most widely used hydrocarbon. However - as this excerpt from Infield's 'Offshore LNG to 2016' report reveals - natural gas is expected to represent growing proportion of the world's energy mix; with global gas demand forecast to significantly increase over the next few decades. An increase in demand will be driven by the switch from coal to gas fired power plants and the increasing issue of carbon emissions favouring the cleaner burning natural gas, compared to other hydrocarbon fuels. As such, many nations are looking to secure their future gas supplies, often incorporating a range of pipeline and LNG imports. (Author)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2011
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scandinavian Oil-Gas Magazine; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 1/2
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS; LIQUID FUELS; HYDROCARBONS; NATURAL GAS; POWER SUPPLIES; FUEL SUPPLIES; DEMAND; EMISSION
OSTI ID:
1008072
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0332-5334; TRN: NO1105071
Submitting Site:
NW
Size:
page(s) 34-35
Announcement Date:
Mar 14, 2011

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Simpson, Katy, and Venturas, George. Floating LNG and the environmental repercussions for stranded gas going forward; LNG report. Norway: N. p., 2011. Web.
Simpson, Katy, & Venturas, George. Floating LNG and the environmental repercussions for stranded gas going forward; LNG report. Norway.
Simpson, Katy, and Venturas, George. 2011. "Floating LNG and the environmental repercussions for stranded gas going forward; LNG report." Norway.
@misc{etde_1008072,
title = {Floating LNG and the environmental repercussions for stranded gas going forward; LNG report}
author = {Simpson, Katy, and Venturas, George}
abstractNote = {Globally, oil still remains the most widely used hydrocarbon. However - as this excerpt from Infield's 'Offshore LNG to 2016' report reveals - natural gas is expected to represent growing proportion of the world's energy mix; with global gas demand forecast to significantly increase over the next few decades. An increase in demand will be driven by the switch from coal to gas fired power plants and the increasing issue of carbon emissions favouring the cleaner burning natural gas, compared to other hydrocarbon fuels. As such, many nations are looking to secure their future gas supplies, often incorporating a range of pipeline and LNG imports. (Author)}
journal = {Scandinavian Oil-Gas Magazine}
issue = {1/2}
volume = {39}
place = {Norway}
year = {2011}
month = {Jul}
}