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IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report

Abstract

The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. A comprehensive approach to planning is needed that integrates impacts on ecology, the effects of electrical infrastructure, and the layout of wind farms. Governments, which usually finance ecological research, should disclose results for wide dissemination as they become available. As example the workshop held suggested that documents covering the issues like offshore wind energy legislation, Guidelines for EIAs and SEAs and best practices need to be produced and distributed on a regular basis, as ecological research progresses and experience from the planning and operation of existing wind farms emerges. Research should help strike the balance between optimum regulation and the need to get projects up and running. Such research is needed to increase understanding of offshore wind metrology and its impact on electrical power fluctuations. More work is needed  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 15, 2010
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
RISO-R-1755(EN)
Resource Relation:
Other Information: EFP-2006; 2 tabs.
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; OFFSHORE SITES; WIND TURBINES; WIND TURBINE ARRAYS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ECOSYSTEMS; POWER SYSTEMS; POWER TRANSMISSION; REGULATIONS
OSTI ID:
1008028
Research Organizations:
Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Wind Energy Div., Roskilde (Denmark)
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract ENS-33032-0051; ISBN 978-87-550-3860-8; ISBN 978-87-550-3860-8; TRN: DK1101026
Availability:
Also available at http://www.risoe.dtu.dk/rispubl/reports/ris-r-1755.pdf; OSTI as DE01008028
Submitting Site:
DK
Size:
48 p. pages
Announcement Date:
Mar 11, 2011

Citation Formats

Lemming, J. IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report. Denmark: N. p., 2010. Web.
Lemming, J. IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report. Denmark.
Lemming, J. 2010. "IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report." Denmark.
@misc{etde_1008028,
title = {IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report}
author = {Lemming, J}
abstractNote = {The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. A comprehensive approach to planning is needed that integrates impacts on ecology, the effects of electrical infrastructure, and the layout of wind farms. Governments, which usually finance ecological research, should disclose results for wide dissemination as they become available. As example the workshop held suggested that documents covering the issues like offshore wind energy legislation, Guidelines for EIAs and SEAs and best practices need to be produced and distributed on a regular basis, as ecological research progresses and experience from the planning and operation of existing wind farms emerges. Research should help strike the balance between optimum regulation and the need to get projects up and running. Such research is needed to increase understanding of offshore wind metrology and its impact on electrical power fluctuations. More work is needed to develop special grid code and standards for offshore. The transient behavior of large cable installations (switching / harmonic/ Behavior and modeling of large HV cable systems) must be better understood. Connection and control systems must be developed for large offshore wind farms. Work is needed to develop the technical architecture of offshore wind grid systems. Public access to measurements (e.g., turbine power output, meteorological masts, buoys) is important, especially for model validation. Determining wake effects is currently the most important challenge in wind engineering. Emphasis should be put into observing and understanding winds 50 m and higher above the surface. The logarithmic wind profile seems to be invalid at these heights, even with neutral conditions. Problems have been found with wave models in shallow water. An unexpectedly low correlation has been observed between wind data and wave height. Wave spreading and especially misalignment between wind and wave directions needs further investigation and water level transients and coastal currents should be included in models. Slamming and forces from breaking waves and likelihood of breakers must be assessed both in deep waters and in shallower water. (LN)}
place = {Denmark}
year = {2010}
month = {Oct}
}