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Techno-economic modelling of value chains based on natural gas: - with consideration of CO{sub 2} emissions

Thesis/Dissertation:

Abstract

This thesis presents and discusses techno-economic models for value chains based on natural gas (NG). The research has been financed by the Research Council of Norway through project 165818 'Optimal design and operation of gas-processing plants'. Technologically speaking, processing of natural gas means to separate the 'rich gas' from the gas wells into 'dry gas', 'wet gas' and other products. However, in this thesis 'processing' is given the wider meaning of preparation for utilization. The main usage of NG is combustion to exploit the energy. One of the combustion products is CO{sub 2}. Human made emissions of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases (GHG) are a likely cause of climate change. Climate change is an issue that gets more and more attention in the media, and it is among the top issues on the political agenda. The atmospheric concentration of GHGs has risen faster than ever in human history, and we are entering uncharted territory. Continuing the current irreversible GHG accumulation is a risky strategy. Drastic emission cuts are unpopular because of the associated costs. Four of the papers concern minimization of costs of reducing carbon emissions from gas usage relative to business as usual. Three alternatives for emission reduction  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2010
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Doctoral theses at NTNU; ISSN 1503-8181; 2010:83; Numerical Data; Thesis or Dissertation; TH: Thesis (Ph.D); refs., figs., tabs
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS; LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION; GREENHOUSE GASES; EMISSION; STATIONARY POLLUTANT SOURCES; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CAPTURE; LIFE-CYCLE COST; COMPILED DATA
OSTI ID:
1007299
Research Organizations:
Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim (Norway)
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-82-471-2129-0; TRN: NO1105039
Availability:
Available at: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-7878
Submitting Site:
NW
Size:
220 p. pages
Announcement Date:
Mar 07, 2011

Thesis/Dissertation:

Citation Formats

Myklebust, Jogeir. Techno-economic modelling of value chains based on natural gas: - with consideration of CO{sub 2} emissions. Norway: N. p., 2010. Web.
Myklebust, Jogeir. Techno-economic modelling of value chains based on natural gas: - with consideration of CO{sub 2} emissions. Norway.
Myklebust, Jogeir. 2010. "Techno-economic modelling of value chains based on natural gas: - with consideration of CO{sub 2} emissions." Norway.
@misc{etde_1007299,
title = {Techno-economic modelling of value chains based on natural gas: - with consideration of CO{sub 2} emissions}
author = {Myklebust, Jogeir}
abstractNote = {This thesis presents and discusses techno-economic models for value chains based on natural gas (NG). The research has been financed by the Research Council of Norway through project 165818 'Optimal design and operation of gas-processing plants'. Technologically speaking, processing of natural gas means to separate the 'rich gas' from the gas wells into 'dry gas', 'wet gas' and other products. However, in this thesis 'processing' is given the wider meaning of preparation for utilization. The main usage of NG is combustion to exploit the energy. One of the combustion products is CO{sub 2}. Human made emissions of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases (GHG) are a likely cause of climate change. Climate change is an issue that gets more and more attention in the media, and it is among the top issues on the political agenda. The atmospheric concentration of GHGs has risen faster than ever in human history, and we are entering uncharted territory. Continuing the current irreversible GHG accumulation is a risky strategy. Drastic emission cuts are unpopular because of the associated costs. Four of the papers concern minimization of costs of reducing carbon emissions from gas usage relative to business as usual. Three alternatives for emission reduction are considered. For modest abatement levels, the lowest cost option is to increase the efficiency of existing technologies. Intermediate abatement levels are not possible without drastic technology changes such as carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). Carbon can be captured before combustion by reforming the hydrocarbons to hydrogen, or after combustion by absorbing CO{sub 2} from the exhaust. Removal after combustion is feasible for large stationary units such as power plants. For small units such as vehicles it is not practical to store emissions on board, and the carbon must be removed before the vehicles are filled. The thesis consists of two parts. The first part is this introduction, which is structured as follows: The scientific contribution of the papers and the authors role in research and writing processes are presented in Section 1.1. Section 1.2 explains how the physical and chemical properties of NG shape its role in present and future energy markets. Section 1.3 outlines how technological limitations and interactions can be represented mathematically in energy economic models. Section 1.4 discusses how the prices that are necessary input to some of the techno-economic models can be obtained. The second part consists of the five papers. (AG)}
place = {Norway}
year = {2010}
month = {Jul}
}