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Biochar filter - carbon containing ashes for agricultural purposes

Technical Report:

Abstract

Intensification of agriculture has led to increased nutrient inputs, but also to a reduction in biodiversity. Althrough there is already data on agricultural environmental problems abundantly available, the practical implementation of the measures has so far not been sufficient for the Baltic Sea and biodiversity. Biomass gasification process produces biochar-ash mixture that is partly burnable but always char/ash containing residue is produced that needs to be disposed Reasons such as existing boilers capacity, amounts and mixing ration of ash/coal cannot generate optimal energy utilisation possibilities etc., that might bring in a need to look alternative uses for the mixture instead of just land filling it. Overall process optimisation and future CO{sub 2} prices might support not using a low bio carbon mixture in energy generation but using it in soil and generate carbon sink as well (bio CCS). Biomass gasification produces 5-10% char that is mainly (70-95%) carbon (unburnt). Burning it in a FB boiler reduces carbon content, but e.g. fly ash still has 40-70% carbon. This ash is typically landfilled so BTL production creates increased ash disposal and increased landfilling costs. Finding alternative sustainable uses for gasification residue might promote better carbon footprint for BTL plant. It seems clear  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2010
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
LUT/Energy-RR-9
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 36 refs.
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; AGRICULTURE; BIOMASS; GASIFICATION; CHARS; ASHES; METALS; CARBON; RECYCLING; FERTILIZERS
OSTI ID:
1007278
Research Organizations:
Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland). LUT Energy
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-952-265-018-4; TRN: FI1103004
Availability:
Available from Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, P.O.Box 20, FI-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
36 p. pages
Announcement Date:
Mar 07, 2011

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Luostarinen, K, Vakkilainen, E, and Bergamov, G. Biochar filter - carbon containing ashes for agricultural purposes. Finland: N. p., 2010. Web.
Luostarinen, K, Vakkilainen, E, & Bergamov, G. Biochar filter - carbon containing ashes for agricultural purposes. Finland.
Luostarinen, K, Vakkilainen, E, and Bergamov, G. 2010. "Biochar filter - carbon containing ashes for agricultural purposes." Finland.
@misc{etde_1007278,
title = {Biochar filter - carbon containing ashes for agricultural purposes}
author = {Luostarinen, K, Vakkilainen, E, and Bergamov, G}
abstractNote = {Intensification of agriculture has led to increased nutrient inputs, but also to a reduction in biodiversity. Althrough there is already data on agricultural environmental problems abundantly available, the practical implementation of the measures has so far not been sufficient for the Baltic Sea and biodiversity. Biomass gasification process produces biochar-ash mixture that is partly burnable but always char/ash containing residue is produced that needs to be disposed Reasons such as existing boilers capacity, amounts and mixing ration of ash/coal cannot generate optimal energy utilisation possibilities etc., that might bring in a need to look alternative uses for the mixture instead of just land filling it. Overall process optimisation and future CO{sub 2} prices might support not using a low bio carbon mixture in energy generation but using it in soil and generate carbon sink as well (bio CCS). Biomass gasification produces 5-10% char that is mainly (70-95%) carbon (unburnt). Burning it in a FB boiler reduces carbon content, but e.g. fly ash still has 40-70% carbon. This ash is typically landfilled so BTL production creates increased ash disposal and increased landfilling costs. Finding alternative sustainable uses for gasification residue might promote better carbon footprint for BTL plant. It seems clear that trying to minimize the residual carbon content in gasifier ash will lead to biocoal that is not suitable to be spread neither in the fields nor in the forests. In addition to nickel, lead and vanadinium also quicksilver, cadmium and zink seem to be problematic. In general terms all studied processes (torrefaction, charring and gasification) except the gasification process that tries to minimize residual carbon seem to produce acceptable biocoal for both forest and field fertilization purposes. Cadmium content is the only one that needs to be analyzed before one spreads gasification ash to fields. (orig.)}
place = {Finland}
year = {2010}
month = {Jul}
}