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A survey of potential problems for non-nuclear industries posed by implementation of new EC standards for natural radioactivity

Conference:

Abstract

A working group of experts according to Article 31 of the Euratom Treaty prepared a draft ``Council Directive`` for handling radioactive materials. Particularly for naturally occurring radioactive materials this new Directive allegedly signifies a considerable tightening of the limits below which radioactivity is allowed to be present in the environment. The Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment commissioned an inquiry to be held among a limited number of companies in separate branches of the non-nuclear industries in the Netherlands to inventories the possible consequences for these companies if the published draft Directive were to be implemented unabridged in its present form. This paper provides an analysis of the inquiry. It shows that after implementation of the Directive in the Dutch legal system a number of companies will be under official duty to report or obtain licenses under the Nuclear Energy Act without advantages for radiological protection. For these companies this means a great deal of administrative work and considerable additional costs. If the proposed exemption levels for the naturally occurring radioactive materials, are liberalized by a factor of ten, the problems will be much smaller and controllable. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.
Authors:
Scholten, L C; Roelofs, L M.M.; Steen, J van der [1] 
  1. Kema Nuclear, Arnhem (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1995
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-807; CONF-9311144-
Reference Number:
SCA: 200400; 200500; 016000; PA: AIX-26:063126; EDB-95:129030; ERA-20:025799; SN: 95001457958
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) specialists meeting on experience in the application of exemption principles, Vienna (Austria), 1-5 Nov 1993; Other Information: PBD: Jul 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Experience in the application of exemption principles. Proceedings of a specialists meeting held in Vienna, 2-4 November 1993; PB: 237 p.
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY; LICENSING REGULATIONS; MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE ACTIVITY; CEMENTS; CERAMICS; COAL; COST; FERTILIZERS; FLY ASH; FUEL OILS; GLASS; METALS; MINERALS; NATURAL GAS; NETHERLANDS; PHOSPHATES; PIGMENTS; PUBLIC HEALTH; RADIATION PROTECTION; RAW MATERIALS; THORIUM; ZIRCON
OSTI ID:
100528
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE95634722; TRN: XA9539843063126
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE95634722
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 81-98
Announcement Date:
Jan 16, 2004

Conference:

Citation Formats

Scholten, L C, Roelofs, L M.M., and Steen, J van der. A survey of potential problems for non-nuclear industries posed by implementation of new EC standards for natural radioactivity. IAEA: N. p., 1995. Web.
Scholten, L C, Roelofs, L M.M., & Steen, J van der. A survey of potential problems for non-nuclear industries posed by implementation of new EC standards for natural radioactivity. IAEA.
Scholten, L C, Roelofs, L M.M., and Steen, J van der. 1995. "A survey of potential problems for non-nuclear industries posed by implementation of new EC standards for natural radioactivity." IAEA.
@misc{etde_100528,
title = {A survey of potential problems for non-nuclear industries posed by implementation of new EC standards for natural radioactivity}
author = {Scholten, L C, Roelofs, L M.M., and Steen, J van der}
abstractNote = {A working group of experts according to Article 31 of the Euratom Treaty prepared a draft ``Council Directive`` for handling radioactive materials. Particularly for naturally occurring radioactive materials this new Directive allegedly signifies a considerable tightening of the limits below which radioactivity is allowed to be present in the environment. The Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment commissioned an inquiry to be held among a limited number of companies in separate branches of the non-nuclear industries in the Netherlands to inventories the possible consequences for these companies if the published draft Directive were to be implemented unabridged in its present form. This paper provides an analysis of the inquiry. It shows that after implementation of the Directive in the Dutch legal system a number of companies will be under official duty to report or obtain licenses under the Nuclear Energy Act without advantages for radiological protection. For these companies this means a great deal of administrative work and considerable additional costs. If the proposed exemption levels for the naturally occurring radioactive materials, are liberalized by a factor of ten, the problems will be much smaller and controllable. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1995}
month = {Jul}
}