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The development of the vanadium redox battery

Journal Article:

Abstract

The only commercially available battery system that is feasible for energy storage is the Pb-acid battery. It possesses, however, a number of limitations which have led to an on-going effort around the world to solve the problem of energy storage using advanced battery systems. Following initial research and development efforts with zinc-chromium, zinc-bromide, sodium-sulphide and iron-chromium redox flow batteries, the zinc-bromide and sodium sulphur batteries were selected for the 1 MW demonstration phase, based on their superior performance and foot-print energy density compared with the other two systems. In spite of the shortcomings of the Fe-Cr system, however, the large number of attractive features offered by redox flow battery systems, prompted an investigation in 1984 into using alternative redox couples to overcome some of these limitations. Trials are underway in the use of vanadium battery systems in a solar demonstration house in Thailand and in and electric golf-cart to demonstrate the concept of the vanadium redox battery for electric vehicles. Due to its relatively low energy density, the vanadium battery would presently be limited to applications such as recreational vehicles, buses and vans, however with modifications it could lead to a battery which would meet all the requirements stipulated by  More>>
Authors:
Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria [1] 
  1. New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 250900; 330300; PA: AU-95:0E0014; EDB-95:129409; SN: 95001456145
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annual Report - University of New South Wales. Energy Research, Development and Information Centre; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: DN: Adapted from the ERDIC Annual Lecture, November 8 1994.; PBD: 1994
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ELECTRIC BATTERIES; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ENERGY STORAGE; REDOX REACTIONS; VANADIUM; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION
OSTI ID:
100401
Research Organizations:
New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). Energy Research Development and Information Centre
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: XZ4223; ISSN 0157-8502; TRN: AU95E0014
Submitting Site:
AU
Size:
pp. 19-23
Announcement Date:
Oct 04, 1995

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria. The development of the vanadium redox battery. Australia: N. p., 1994. Web.
Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria. The development of the vanadium redox battery. Australia.
Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria. 1994. "The development of the vanadium redox battery." Australia.
@misc{etde_100401,
title = {The development of the vanadium redox battery}
author = {Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria}
abstractNote = {The only commercially available battery system that is feasible for energy storage is the Pb-acid battery. It possesses, however, a number of limitations which have led to an on-going effort around the world to solve the problem of energy storage using advanced battery systems. Following initial research and development efforts with zinc-chromium, zinc-bromide, sodium-sulphide and iron-chromium redox flow batteries, the zinc-bromide and sodium sulphur batteries were selected for the 1 MW demonstration phase, based on their superior performance and foot-print energy density compared with the other two systems. In spite of the shortcomings of the Fe-Cr system, however, the large number of attractive features offered by redox flow battery systems, prompted an investigation in 1984 into using alternative redox couples to overcome some of these limitations. Trials are underway in the use of vanadium battery systems in a solar demonstration house in Thailand and in and electric golf-cart to demonstrate the concept of the vanadium redox battery for electric vehicles. Due to its relatively low energy density, the vanadium battery would presently be limited to applications such as recreational vehicles, buses and vans, however with modifications it could lead to a battery which would meet all the requirements stipulated by car manufacturers when assessing the current and future battery technologies for electric vehicles.(author). photo.}
journal = {Annual Report - University of New South Wales. Energy Research, Development and Information Centre}
issue = {17}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Australia}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}