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Solar energy

Technical Report:

Abstract

Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth. In a sustainable future with an ever-increasing demand for energy, we will need to use this resource better. Solar energy technologies either convert sunlight directly into heat and electrical energy or use it to power chemical conversions which create 'solar fuels' or synthetic compounds. Solar heating technologies have developed steadily for many years and solar heating and cooling is one of the world's commonest renewable energy technologies. This chapter, however, focuses on technologies for electricity production and touches more briefly on the prospects for solar fuels. The section on Danish perspectives also discusses solar thermal heating in district heating plants. In recent decades, two technologies for converting solar energy into electrical energy have dominated: photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP). Today's silicon and thin-film PV technologies are advancing steadily, with new materials and technologies constantly being developed, and there are clear roadmaps for lowering production costs. In the discussion below we assess the maturation potential of currently emerging PV technologies within the next 40 years. Concentrating solar power is already a proven technology, and below we evaluate its potential to become a substantial part of the energy mix by  More>>
Authors:
Sommer-Larsen, P; Krebs, F C; [1]  Plaza, D M [2] 
  1. Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)
  2. Plataforma Solar de Almeria-CIEMAT (Spain)
Publication Date:
Nov 15, 2010
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
RISO-R-1729(EN)
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Risoe energy report 9. Non-fossil energy technologies in 2050 and beyond| Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)| 96 p.; 118 refs., 44 figs., 10 tabs.
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; REVIEWS; SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR CELLS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT
OSTI ID:
1001408
Research Organizations:
Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Rel-TRN: DK1102002; ISBN 978-87-550-3812-7; ISBN 978-87-550-3813-4 (internet); TRN: DK1101008
Availability:
Available as part of the following larger document: www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1001405-iiyhK2/; Also available at http://www.risoe.dtu.dk/rispubl/reports/ris-r-1729.pdf
Submitting Site:
DK
Size:
23-30 pages
Announcement Date:
Jan 20, 2011

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Sommer-Larsen, P, Krebs, F C, and Plaza, D M. Solar energy. Denmark: N. p., 2010. Web.
Sommer-Larsen, P, Krebs, F C, & Plaza, D M. Solar energy. Denmark.
Sommer-Larsen, P, Krebs, F C, and Plaza, D M. 2010. "Solar energy." Denmark.
@misc{etde_1001408,
title = {Solar energy}
author = {Sommer-Larsen, P, Krebs, F C, and Plaza, D M}
abstractNote = {Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth. In a sustainable future with an ever-increasing demand for energy, we will need to use this resource better. Solar energy technologies either convert sunlight directly into heat and electrical energy or use it to power chemical conversions which create 'solar fuels' or synthetic compounds. Solar heating technologies have developed steadily for many years and solar heating and cooling is one of the world's commonest renewable energy technologies. This chapter, however, focuses on technologies for electricity production and touches more briefly on the prospects for solar fuels. The section on Danish perspectives also discusses solar thermal heating in district heating plants. In recent decades, two technologies for converting solar energy into electrical energy have dominated: photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP). Today's silicon and thin-film PV technologies are advancing steadily, with new materials and technologies constantly being developed, and there are clear roadmaps for lowering production costs. In the discussion below we assess the maturation potential of currently emerging PV technologies within the next 40 years. Concentrating solar power is already a proven technology, and below we evaluate its potential to become a substantial part of the energy mix by 2050. Solar fuels cover a range of technologies. The chapter is to a great extent based on two recent roadmaps from the International Energy Agency (IEA). Many reports, predictions, scenarios and roadmaps for solar energy deployment exist. The IEA predictions for the penetration of solar energy in the future energy system are low relative to many of the other studies. The IEA roadmaps, however, cover most aspects of the future deployment of the technologies and reference older work. (Author)}
place = {Denmark}
year = {2010}
month = {Nov}
}