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Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in 2009, political leaders emphasized their strong political will to urgently combat climate change in accordance with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Scaled-up, new and additional, predictable and adequate funding, as well as improved access, shall be provided to developing countries, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation, developed countries committed themselves to a goal of jointly mobilizing US$100 billion a year by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries. The Secretary-General of the United Nations established the High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing in February 2010. Following its terms of reference, the Advisory Group worked around the goal of mobilizing US$100 billion per year by 2020. The Advisory Group concluded that it is challenging but feasible to meet that goal. Funding will need to come from a wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including alternative sources of finance, the scaling up of existing sources and increased private flows. Grants and highly concessional loans are crucial for adaptation in the most  More>>
Publication Date:
Nov 15, 2010
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; UNITED NATIONS; CLIMATIC CHANGE; FINANCING; MITIGATION; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; UNFCCC; EMISSIONS TAX; EMISSIONS TRADING
OSTI ID:
1000218
Research Organizations:
United Nations, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Origin:
UN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XU10CC188
Availability:
Available at http://www.un.org/wcm/webdav/site/climatechange/shared/Documents/AGF_repor ts/AGF_Final_Report.pdf
Submitting Site:
DK
Size:
81 p. pages
Announcement Date:
Dec 21, 2010

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

None. Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing. UN: N. p., 2010. Web.
None. Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing. UN.
None. 2010. "Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing." UN.
@misc{etde_1000218,
title = {Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in 2009, political leaders emphasized their strong political will to urgently combat climate change in accordance with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Scaled-up, new and additional, predictable and adequate funding, as well as improved access, shall be provided to developing countries, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation, developed countries committed themselves to a goal of jointly mobilizing US$100 billion a year by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries. The Secretary-General of the United Nations established the High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing in February 2010. Following its terms of reference, the Advisory Group worked around the goal of mobilizing US$100 billion per year by 2020. The Advisory Group concluded that it is challenging but feasible to meet that goal. Funding will need to come from a wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including alternative sources of finance, the scaling up of existing sources and increased private flows. Grants and highly concessional loans are crucial for adaptation in the most vulnerable developing countries, such as the least developed countries, small island developing States and Africa. Strong commitments to domestic mitigation and the introduction of new public instruments based on carbon pricing are important for mobilizing climate financing, both public and private. Instruments based on carbon pricing are particularly attractive because they both raise revenue and provide incentives for mitigation actions. Naturally, given the complexity of the analysis and the diverse group of members involved, there were differences in perspectives, such as whether and how to measure revenues in terms of gross and net metrics. These are reflected in the report. (LN)}
place = {UN}
year = {2010}
month = {Nov}
}