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Title: Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

Abstract

A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

Inventors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge, TN
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
874713
Patent Number(s):
6447663
Assignee:
UT-Battelle, LLC (Oak Ridge, TN)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
Y - NEW / CROSS SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES Y10 - TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC Y10S - TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
B - PERFORMING OPERATIONS B82 - NANOTECHNOLOGY B82Y - SPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
programmable; nanometer-scale; electrolytic; metal; deposition; depletion; method; nanostructure; steps; providing; substrate; electrically; conductive; nanostructures; spaced; 50; mum; apart; depositing; electric; field-directed; pulsed; moreover; disposed; depleting; portion; bypass; circuit; enables; ultra-finely; controlled; electrically conductive; electric field; metal deposition; /205/

Citation Formats

Lee, James Weifu, and Greenbaum, Elias. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Lee, James Weifu, & Greenbaum, Elias. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion. United States.
Lee, James Weifu, and Greenbaum, Elias. Tue . "Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874713.
@article{osti_874713,
title = {Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion},
author = {Lee, James Weifu and Greenbaum, Elias},
abstractNote = {A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {9}
}

Patent:

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Works referenced in this record:

Controlled fabrication of metallic electrodes with atomic separation
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Electrochemical Micromachining
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Molecular Ionic Probes:  A New Class of Hill Reagents and Their Potential for Nanofabrication and Biometallocatalysis
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Photosynthetic Water Splitting: In situ Photoprecipitation of Metallocatalysts for Photoevolution of Hydrogen and Oxygen
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