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Title: Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

Abstract

Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

Inventors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Livermore, CA
  2. Fremont, CA
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
874346
Patent Number(s):
6372103
Assignee:
The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
B - PERFORMING OPERATIONS B23 - MACHINE TOOLS B23K - SOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING
C - CHEMISTRY C23 - COATING METALLIC MATERIAL C23C - COATING METALLIC MATERIAL
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
ultrashort; pulse; laser; deposition; films; pld; viable; technique; producing; quality; properties; close; crystalline; diamond; plasma; generated; femtosecond; lasers; composed; single; atom; clusters; spsup3; spsup2; ratios; average; power; dramatically; increases; rates; 25; mumhr; exceeds; cvd; processes; growing; particulate-free; function; wavelength; fluence; spot; size; targetsubstrate; separation; relevant; parameters; shown; ensure; growth; characterizations; grown; diagnostic; techniques; including; electron; energy; loss; spectroscopy; eels; raman; raman spectroscopy; pulse laser; /204/378/

Citation Formats

Perry, Michael D, Banks, Paul S, and Stuart, Brent C. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Perry, Michael D, Banks, Paul S, & Stuart, Brent C. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films. United States.
Perry, Michael D, Banks, Paul S, and Stuart, Brent C. Tue . "Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874346.
@article{osti_874346,
title = {Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films},
author = {Perry, Michael D and Banks, Paul S and Stuart, Brent C},
abstractNote = {Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Laser‐induced surface structures on diamond films
journal, September 1995


Control of light polarization in InGaAsP/InP lasers by injection of light pulses
journal, March 1997


Short-pulse high-intensity laser-generated fast electron transport into thick solid targets
journal, December 1997