DOE Patents title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

Abstract

A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

Inventors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. San Ramon, CA
  2. Tracy, CA
  3. Walnut Creek, CA
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
871433
Patent Number(s):
5731153
Assignee:
Regents of University of California (Oakland, CA)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
C - CHEMISTRY C12 - BIOCHEMISTRY C12Q - MEASURING OR TESTING PROCESSES INVOLVING ENZYMES, NUCLEIC ACIDS OR MICROORGANISMS
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
identification; random; nucleic; acid; sequence; aberrations; dual; capture; probes; hybridize; chromosome; regions; method; provided; detecting; immobilization; steps; according; aberration; detected; sequences; type; presence; indicating; hybridization; probe; isolate; set; acids; sample; contain; sequence aberration; detecting nucleic; sequence aberrations; sequence type; acid sequence; nucleic acid; acid sequences; nucleic acids; hybridization probe; sequence indicating; immobilization steps; /435/999/

Citation Formats

Lucas, Joe N, Straume, Tore, and Bogen, Kenneth T. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Lucas, Joe N, Straume, Tore, & Bogen, Kenneth T. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions. United States.
Lucas, Joe N, Straume, Tore, and Bogen, Kenneth T. Tue . "Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/871433.
@article{osti_871433,
title = {Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions},
author = {Lucas, Joe N and Straume, Tore and Bogen, Kenneth T},
abstractNote = {A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {3}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Rapid Human Chromosome Aberration Analysis Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization
journal, January 1989


Rapid Translocation Frequency Analysis in Humans Decades after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation
journal, January 1992


A versatile acid-labile linker for modification of synthetic biomolecules
journal, January 1990


A cleavable biotinylating agent and its use in protein electroblots
journal, August 1992


A reagent for covalently attaching biotin to proteins via a cleavable connector arm
journal, October 1982


Fluorescence in situ hybridization with human chromosome-specific libraries: detection of trisomy 21 and translocations of chromosome 4.
journal, December 1988


Two-step affinity chromatography. Model systems and an example using biotin-avidin binding and a fluoridolyzable linker
journal, November 1991


Detection of bcr-abl fusion in chronic myelogeneous leukemia by in situ hybridization
journal, October 1990


Affinity purification method using a reversible biotinylating reagent for peptides synthesized by the solid-phase technique
journal, May 1993


Facile Preparation and some Applications of an Affinity Matrix with a Cleavable Connector arm Containing a Disulfide bond
journal, June 1987


Cytogenetic analysis using quantitative, high-sensitivity, fluorescence hybridization.
journal, May 1986


Rapid and sensitive colorimetric method for visualizing biotin-labeled DNA probes hybridized to DNA or RNA immobilized on nitrocellulose: Bio-blots.
journal, July 1983