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Title: Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

Abstract

A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

Inventors:
 [1]
  1. Madison, WI
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
863047
Patent Number(s):
4082951
Assignee:
United States of America as represented by United States (Washington, DC)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
G - PHYSICS G01 - MEASURING G01T - MEASUREMENT OF NUCLEAR OR X-RADIATION
DOE Contract Number:  
AT(11-1)-1105
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
compton; effect; thermally; activated; depolarization; dosimeter; dosimetry; technique; high-energy; gamma; radiation; x-radiation; employs; conjunction; radiation-induced; phenomena; dielectric; material; disposed; electrodes; electrically; circuited; produce; exposed; impinging; interacts; directly; metal; composing; electrode; electrons; emitted; preferentially; direction; traveling; portion; trapped; consequently; inducing; stable; electrical; polarization; subsequent; heating; onset; ionic; conductivity; shorted; ammeter; causes; depolarize; signal; measured; proportional; dose; received; subsequent heat; thermally activated; ionic conductivity; gamma radiation; dielectric material; radiation impinging; radiation received; polarization phenomena; compton effect; energy gamma; activated depolarization; material directly; /250/

Citation Formats

Moran, Paul R. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter. United States: N. p., 1978. Web.
Moran, Paul R. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter. United States.
Moran, Paul R. Sun . "Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/863047.
@article{osti_863047,
title = {Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter},
author = {Moran, Paul R},
abstractNote = {A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1978},
month = {1}
}

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