skip to main content
DOE Patents title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Multi-lead heat sink

Abstract

The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

Inventors:
Issue Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6006742
Application Number:
ON: DE83013157
Assignee:
ERA-08-036944; EDB-83-113449
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; HEAT SINKS; SOLDERING; SPRINGS; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; FABRICATION; JOINING; MACHINE PARTS; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; SINKS; WELDING; 420800* - Engineering- Electronic Circuits & Devices- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Roose, L.D. Multi-lead heat sink. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Roose, L.D. Multi-lead heat sink. United States.
Roose, L.D. Wed . "Multi-lead heat sink". United States.
@article{osti_6006742,
title = {Multi-lead heat sink},
author = {Roose, L.D.},
abstractNote = {The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1982},
month = {8}
}