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Title: Fiber optic moisture sensor

Abstract

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Inventors:
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5832618
Application Number:
ON: DE85011651
Assignee:
Dept. of Energy EDB-85-087913
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; MOISTURE GAGES; FIBER OPTICS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; 440300* - Miscellaneous Instruments- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Kirkham, R.R. Fiber optic moisture sensor. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Kirkham, R.R. Fiber optic moisture sensor. United States.
Kirkham, R.R. Fri . "Fiber optic moisture sensor". United States.
@article{osti_5832618,
title = {Fiber optic moisture sensor},
author = {Kirkham, R.R.},
abstractNote = {A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1984},
month = {8}
}