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Title: Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons

Abstract

The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO{sub 2} with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. 5 figs.

Inventors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Battelle Memorial Institute
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
541748
Patent Number(s):
5,680,423
Application Number:
PAN: 8-410,169; TRN: 97:019542
Assignee:
Battelle Memorial Inst., Richland, WA (United States) PTO; SCA: 440101; PA: EDB-97:142122; SN: 97001865586
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Oct 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; NEUTRON DETECTION; SOLID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; PHOTODETECTORS; OPTICAL FIBERS; DESIGN

Citation Formats

Perkins, R.W., Reeder, P.L., Wogman, N.A., Warner, R.A., Brite, D.W., Richey, W.C., and Goldman, D.S. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Perkins, R.W., Reeder, P.L., Wogman, N.A., Warner, R.A., Brite, D.W., Richey, W.C., & Goldman, D.S. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons. United States.
Perkins, R.W., Reeder, P.L., Wogman, N.A., Warner, R.A., Brite, D.W., Richey, W.C., and Goldman, D.S. Tue . "Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons". United States.
@article{osti_541748,
title = {Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons},
author = {Perkins, R.W. and Reeder, P.L. and Wogman, N.A. and Warner, R.A. and Brite, D.W. and Richey, W.C. and Goldman, D.S.},
abstractNote = {The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO{sub 2} with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. 5 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {10}
}