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Title: HIGH SPEED CAMERA

Abstract

This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

Inventors:
;
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Originating Research Org. not identified
OSTI Identifier:
4329457
Patent Number(s):
2816476
Assignee:
U.S. Atomic Energy commission DTIE; NSA-12-007029
NSA Number:
NSA-12-007029
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-58
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
PATENTS; CAMERAS; EXPLOSIONS; IMAGES; LENSES; OPTICAL SYSTEMS; PATENT; PHOTOGRAPHY; REFLECTION; RESOLUTION; ROTATION; SURFACES; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Rogers, B.T. Jr., and Davis, W.C. HIGH SPEED CAMERA. United States: N. p., 1957. Web.
Rogers, B.T. Jr., & Davis, W.C. HIGH SPEED CAMERA. United States.
Rogers, B.T. Jr., and Davis, W.C. Tue . "HIGH SPEED CAMERA". United States.
@article{osti_4329457,
title = {HIGH SPEED CAMERA},
author = {Rogers, B.T. Jr. and Davis, W.C.},
abstractNote = {This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1957},
month = {12}
}