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Title: Imaging bolometer

Abstract

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Inventors:
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
321302
Patent Number(s):
5861625
Application Number:
PAN: 8-857,470; TRN: 99:003335
Assignee:
Univ. of California, Los Alamos, NM (United States)
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 19 Jan 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; BOLOMETERS; DESIGN; INFRARED RADIATION; CAMERAS; TIME RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Wurden, G A. Imaging bolometer. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Wurden, G A. Imaging bolometer. United States.
Wurden, G A. Tue . "Imaging bolometer". United States.
@article{osti_321302,
title = {Imaging bolometer},
author = {Wurden, G A},
abstractNote = {Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {1}
}