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Title: Localized atmospheric laser chemical vapor deposition

Abstract

An atmospheric, Laser-based Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) technique provides highly localized deposition of material to mitigate damage sites on an optical component. The same laser beam can be used to deposit material as well as for in-situ annealing of the deposited material. The net result of the LCVD process is in-filling and planarization of a treated site, which produces optically more damage resistant surfaces. Several deposition and annealing steps can be interleaved during a single cycle for more precise control on amount of deposited material as well as for increasing the damage threshold for the deposited material.

Inventors:
;
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1503530
Patent Number(s):
10,208,377
Application Number:
14/389,709
Assignee:
Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Livermore, CA)
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2013 Apr 19
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph, and Elhadj, Selim. Localized atmospheric laser chemical vapor deposition. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph, & Elhadj, Selim. Localized atmospheric laser chemical vapor deposition. United States.
Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph, and Elhadj, Selim. Tue . "Localized atmospheric laser chemical vapor deposition". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1503530.
@article{osti_1503530,
title = {Localized atmospheric laser chemical vapor deposition},
author = {Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph and Elhadj, Selim},
abstractNote = {An atmospheric, Laser-based Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) technique provides highly localized deposition of material to mitigate damage sites on an optical component. The same laser beam can be used to deposit material as well as for in-situ annealing of the deposited material. The net result of the LCVD process is in-filling and planarization of a treated site, which produces optically more damage resistant surfaces. Several deposition and annealing steps can be interleaved during a single cycle for more precise control on amount of deposited material as well as for increasing the damage threshold for the deposited material.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Hybrid LCVD of micro-metallic lines for TFT-LCD circuit repair
journal, November 2006