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Title: High frequency nanotube oscillator

Abstract

A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

Inventors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Houston, TX
  2. Kensington, TX
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1036474
Patent Number(s):
8120448
Application Number:
12/446,231
Assignee:
The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
H - ELECTRICITY H03 - BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY H03B - GENERATION OF OSCILLATIONS, DIRECTLY OR BY FREQUENCY-CHANGING, BY CIRCUITS EMPLOYING ACTIVE ELEMENTS WHICH OPERATE IN A NON-SWITCHING MANNER
Y - NEW / CROSS SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES Y10 - TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC Y10S - TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Peng, Haibing, and Zettl, Alexander K. High frequency nanotube oscillator. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Peng, Haibing, & Zettl, Alexander K. High frequency nanotube oscillator. United States.
Peng, Haibing, and Zettl, Alexander K. Tue . "High frequency nanotube oscillator". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1036474.
@article{osti_1036474,
title = {High frequency nanotube oscillator},
author = {Peng, Haibing and Zettl, Alexander K},
abstractNote = {A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {2}
}

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