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Title: Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons

Abstract

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contain Carbon and some combination of Fluorine and Chlorine atoms. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) contain Hydrogen, Fluorine, and Carbon (no chlorine). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) contain Hydrogen, Chlorine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Hydrobromofluorocarbons (HBFCs) contain Hydrogen, Bromine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Perfluorocarbons contain Fluorine, Carbon, and Bromine atoms, and some contain Chlorine and/or Hydrogen atoms. These compounds are often designated by a combination of letters and numbers (e.g., CFC-11, HCFC-142b). In the latter example, the lower-case b refers to an isomer, which has no relationship to the chemical formula (C2H3F2Cl), but designates a particular structural arrangement of the atoms included. For example, HCFC-142b identifies the isomer in which all three hydrogen atoms are attached to the same carbon atom, and the structural formula is written as CH3CF2Cl. By contrast, HCFC-142 (without the b) refers to an arrangement in which one carbon atom is attached to two hydrogen atoms and one chlorine atom, while the other carbon atom is attached to the third hydrogen atom and two fluorine atoms. Hence, it has a different structural formula (CH2ClCHF2).

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
ESS-DIVE (Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1394399
DOI:
10.3334/CDIAC/atg.033

Citation Formats

Blasing, T. J., and Jones, Sonja. Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.033.
Blasing, T. J., & Jones, Sonja. Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons. United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.033.
Blasing, T. J., and Jones, Sonja. 2012. "Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.033. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394399. Pub date:Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2012
@article{osti_1394399,
title = {Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons},
author = {Blasing, T. J. and Jones, Sonja},
abstractNote = {Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contain Carbon and some combination of Fluorine and Chlorine atoms. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) contain Hydrogen, Fluorine, and Carbon (no chlorine). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) contain Hydrogen, Chlorine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Hydrobromofluorocarbons (HBFCs) contain Hydrogen, Bromine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Perfluorocarbons contain Fluorine, Carbon, and Bromine atoms, and some contain Chlorine and/or Hydrogen atoms. These compounds are often designated by a combination of letters and numbers (e.g., CFC-11, HCFC-142b). In the latter example, the lower-case b refers to an isomer, which has no relationship to the chemical formula (C2H3F2Cl), but designates a particular structural arrangement of the atoms included. For example, HCFC-142b identifies the isomer in which all three hydrogen atoms are attached to the same carbon atom, and the structural formula is written as CH3CF2Cl. By contrast, HCFC-142 (without the b) refers to an arrangement in which one carbon atom is attached to two hydrogen atoms and one chlorine atom, while the other carbon atom is attached to the third hydrogen atom and two fluorine atoms. Hence, it has a different structural formula (CH2ClCHF2).},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/atg.033},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {2}
}