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Title: Surface Meteorology at Teller Site Stations, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, Ongoing from 2016

Meteorological data are currently being collected at two locations at the Teller Site, Seward Peninsula. Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussock / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products.
Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Next Generation Ecosystems Experiment - Arctic, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 Environmental Sciences; ngee; ngee-arctic; seward peninsula; teller; Surface condition; PRI; wind direction; wind speed; skin surface temperature; snow temperature; soil moisture; thermal conductivity; soil temperature; OUTGOING LONGWAVE RADIATION; snow depth; dewpoint temperature; incoming longwave radiation; net radiation; NDVI; relative humidity; air temperature; summer precipitation; outgoing shortwave radiation; heat flux; incoming shortwave radiation
OSTI Identifier:
1437633
No associated Projects found.
No associated Collections found.
  1. Meteorological data are currently being collected at one location at the top of the Kougarok hill, Seward Peninsula. This December 18, 2017 release includes data for: Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussockmore » / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products. « less
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