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Title: Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a data archive for Earth and environmental science data. The mission of ESS-DIVE is to preserve, expand access to, and improve usability of critical data generated through DOE-sponsored research of terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems. By making ESS research data easily accessible, ESS-DIVE has the potential to advance the scientific understanding and prediction of hydro-biogeochemical and ecosystem processes that occur from bedrock through soil and vegetation to the atmospheric interface.
Product Type:
Project
Project Lead:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Research Org(s):
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Collaborations:
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Geolocation:
-122.246343,37.875069
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ecosystems; environmental systems science; soil; vegetation; hydro-biogeochemical processes; ecosystem processes; data storage; archive
OSTI Identifier:
1436976
Project Location:
Berkeley, CA
No associated Collections found.
  1. This dataset contains nitrous oxide mixing ratios and supporting information measured at a tall tower (KCMP, 244 m) site near St. Paul, Minnesot, USA. The data include nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide mixing ratios measured at the 100 m level. Turbulence and wind data were measured using a sonic anemometer at the 185 m level. Also included in this dataset are estimates of the "background" nitrous oxide mixing ratios and monthly concentration source footprints derived from WRF-STILT modeling.
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    ESS-DIVE (Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem); University of Minnesota
    Sponsoring Org:
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF); AmeriFlux
  2. These global and hemispheric temperature anomaly time series, which incorporate land and marine data, are continually updated and expanded by P. Jones of the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) with help from colleagues at the CRU and other institutions. Some of the earliest work in producing these temperature series dates back to Jones et al. (1986a,b,c), Jones (1988, 1994), and Jones and Briffa (1992). Most of the discussion of methods given here has been gleaned from the Frequently Asked Questions section of the CRU temperature data web pages. Users are encouraged to visit the CRU Web site for the most comprehensivemore » overview of these data (the "HadCRUT4" dataset), other associated datasets, and the most recent literature references to the work of Jones et al. « less
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    DOE Contract Number:
    AC05-00OR22725
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  3. The mean monthly and annual values of surface air temperature compiled by Lugina et al. have been taken mainly from the World Weather Records, Monthly Climatic Data for the World, and Meteorological Data for Individual Years over the Northern Hemisphere Excluding the USSR. These published records were supplemented with information from different national publications. In the original archive, after removal of station records believed to be nonhomogeneous or biased, 301 and 265 stations were used to determine the mean temperature for the Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively. The new version of the station temperature archive (used for evaluation of themore » zonally-averaged temperatures) was created in 1995. The change to the archive was required because data from some stations became unavailable for analyses in the 1990s. During this process, special care was taken to secure homogeneity of zonally averaged time series. When a station (or a group of stations) stopped reporting, a "new" station (or group of stations) was selected in the same region, and its data for the past 50 years were collected and added to the archive. The processing (area-averaging) was organized in such a way that each time series from a new station spans the reference period (1951-1975) and the years thereafter. It was determined that the addition of the new stations had essentially no effect on the zonally-averaged values for the pre-1990 period. « less
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    DOE Contract Number:
    AC05-00OR22725
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  4. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2008), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2008) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
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    DOE Contract Number:
    AC05-00OR22725
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  5. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2009), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2009) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  6. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2010), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2010) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  7. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2012), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2011) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  8. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2013), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2012) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  9. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2014), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2014) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  10. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2016), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2016) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  11. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the proceduresmore » discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). Further details on the contents and processing of the historical energy statistics are provided in Andres et al. (1999). The 1950 to present CO2 emission estimates are derived primarily from energy statistics published by the United Nations (2017), using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The energy statistics were compiled primarily from annual questionnaires distributed by the U.N. Statistical Office and supplemented by official national statistical publications. As stated in the introduction of the Statistical Yearbook, "in a few cases, official sources are supplemented by other sources and estimates, where these have been subjected to professional scrutiny and debate and are consistent with other independent sources." Data from the U.S. Department of Interior's Geological Survey (USGS 2017) were used to estimate CO2 emitted during cement production. Values for emissions from gas flaring were derived primarily from U.N. data but were supplemented with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (1994), Rotty (1974), and data provided by G. Marland. Greater details about these methods are provided in Marland and Rotty (1984), Boden et al. (1995), and Andres et al. (1999). « less
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  12. This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the U.S. Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the U.S. Gulf Coast into 0.25° latitude by 0.25° longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevations, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights.
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  13. Consumption data for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are multiplied by their respective thermal conversion factors, which are in units of heat energy per unit of fuel consumed (i.e., per cubic foot, barrel, or ton), to calculate the amount of heat energy derived from fuel combustion. The thermal conversion factors are given in Appendix A of each issue of Monthly Energy Review, published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Results are expressed in terms of heat energy obtained from each fuel type. These energy values were obtained from the State Energy Data Reportmore » (EIA, 2003a), ( http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/states/sep_use/total/csv/use_csv.html), and served as our basic input. The energy data are also available in hard copy from the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, as the State Energy Data Report (EIA, 2003a,b). « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  14. This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the U.S. Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the U.S. Gulf Coast into 0.25° latitude by 0.25° longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevations, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights.
    View Dataset
    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  15. The air sampling network used by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) to determine atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) consist of ten sites. Sampling frequency and longevity varies by site. At some sites air samples are collected continuously while at others evacuated glass flasks are used to collect air samples for subsequent analysis at SIO. This database offers monthly and annual CO2 values from ten sites representative of background tropospheric conditions.
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem
  16. Individual measurements have been obtained from flask air samples returned to the CSIRO GASLAB. Typical sample storage times range from days to weeks for some sites (e.g. Cape Grim, Aircraft over Tasmania and Bass Strait) to as much as one year for Macquarie Island and the Antarctic sites. Experiments carried out to test for changes in sample CO2 mixing ratio during storage have shown significant drifts in some flask types over test periods of several months to years (Cooper et al., 1999). Corrections derived from the test results are applied to network data according to flask type. These measurements indicatemore » a rise in annual average atmospheric CO2 concentration from 357.72 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1992 to 383.05 ppmv in 2006, or an increase in annual average of about 1.81 ppmv/year. These flask data may be compared with other flask measurements from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, available through 2004 in TRENDS; both indicate an annual average increase of 1.72 ppmv/year throuth 2004. Differences may be attributed to different sampling times or days, different numbers of samples, and different curve-fitting techniques used to obtain monthly and annual average numbers from flask data. Measurement error in flask data is believed to be small (Masarie et al., 2001). « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
  17. From the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, air samples were collected for the purposes of monitoring atmospheric CO2 from four sites in the AES air sampling network. Air samples were collected approximately once per week, between 12:00 and 16:00 local time, in a pair of evacuated 2-L thick-wall borosilicate glass flasks. Samples were collected under preferred conditions of wind speed and direction (i.e., upwind of the main station and when winds are strong and steady). The flasks were evacuated to pressures of ~1 × 10-4 mbar or 0.01 Pa prior to being sent to the stations. The airwas not dried duringmore » sample collection. The flask data from Alert show an increase in the annual atmospheric CO2 concentration from 341.35 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1981 to 357.21 ppmv in 1991. For Cape St. James, Trivett and Higuchi (1989) reported that the mean annual rate of increase, obtained from the slope of a least-squares regression line through the annual averages, was 1.43 ppmv per year. In August 1992, the weather station at Cape St. James was automated; as a result, the flask sampling program was discontinued at this site. Estevan Point, on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, was chosen as a replacement station. Sampling at Estevan Point started in 1992; thus, the monthly and annual CO2record from Estevan Point is too short to show any long-term trends. The sampling site at Sable Island, off the coast of Nova Scotia, was established in 1975. The flask data from Sable Island show an increase in the annual atmospheric CO2 concentration from 334.49 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1977 (the first full year of data) to 356.02 ppmv in 1990. For Sable Island, Trivett and Higuchi (1989) reported that the mean annual rate of increase, obtained from the slope of a least-squares regression line through the annual averages, was 1.48 ppmv per year. « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  18. Air samples for the purpose of monitoring atmospheric CO2 were collected from five sites in the UBA air sampling network. Annual atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Brotjacklriegel rose from 331.63 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1972 to 353.12 ppmv in 1988. Because of the site's forest location, the monthly atmospheric CO2 record from Brotjacklriegel exhibits very large seasonal amplitude. This amplitude reached almost 40 ppmv in 1985. Minimum mixing ratios are recorded at Brotjacklriegel during July-September; maximum values, during November-March. CO2 concentrations at Deuselbach rose from 340.82 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1972 to 363.76 ppmv inmore » 1989. The monthly atmospheric CO2 record from Deuselbach is influenced by local agricultural activities and photosynthetic depletion but does not exhibit the large seasonal amplitude observed at other UBA monitoring sites. Minimum monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios at Deuselbach are typically observed in August but may appear as early as June. Maximum values are seen in the record for November-March. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Schauinsland rose from ~328 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1972 to ~365 ppmv in 1997. This represents a growth rate of approximately 1.5 ppmv per year. The Schauinsland site is considered the least contaminated of the UBA sites. CO2 concentrations at Waldhof rose from 346.82 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1972 to 372.09 ppmv in 1993. The Waldhof site is subject to pollution sources; consequently, the monthly atmospheric CO2 record exhibits a large seasonal amplitude. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Westerland rose from ~329 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1973 to ~364 ppmv in 1997. The atmospheric CO2 record from Westerland shows a seasonal pattern similar to other UBA sites; minimum values are recorded during July-September; maximum mixing ratios during November-March. « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
  19. The monitoring site at Garmisch-Partenkirchen is considered a grassland valley site. Because of strong local influence (vegetation and meteorology), the CO2 concentrations at Garmisch-Partenkirchen are higher and show greater seasonal amplitudes than the concentrations measured at Wank or Zugspitze. According to the filtered data, the annual atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Garmisch-Partenkirchen increased from 330.2 ppmv in 1978 to 345.1 ppmv in 1986 and from 347.6 ppmv in 1988 to 354.7 ppmv in 1992. The monitoring site at Wank Peak (WMO-BAPMoN station) is located on the grass-covered, rounded top of the mountain, just above the timberline. The mean annual CO2 concentrationsmore » at Wank Peak increased from 334.2 ppmv in 1980 to 348.6 ppmv in 1992. The station at Zugspitze is located near the summit of the highest mountain of the German Alps. In 1990, the site of CO2 sampling was changed from a location 250 m below the summit to a new monitoring station (2937 m above MSL) close to the mountain top. Compatibility of the results was seen from measurements conducted in parallel at the two sites for several months. Because of the high elevation of the mountain station, the CO2 measurements at Zugspitze can be considered free of regional contamination most of the time. The mean annual CO2 concentrations at Zugspitze increased from 333.7 ppmv in 1981 to 349.4 ppmv in 1992. « less
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    Publication Date:
    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
  20. Air samples were collected from five sites in the Main Geophysical Observatory air sampling network to monitor the atmospheric CO2 from 1983 - 1993. Airwas collected generally four times per month in pairs of 1.5-L stainless steel electropolished flasks with one greaseless stainless steel stopcock. Sampling was performed by opening the stopcock of the flasks, which have been evacuated at the central laboratory at the Main Geophysical Observatory (MGO). The air was not dried during sample collection. Attempts were made to obtain samples when the wind speed was >5 m/s and the wind direction corresponded to the predetermined "clean air"more » sector. The period of record at Bering Island is too short to identify any long-term trends in atmospheric CO2 concentrations; however, the yearly mean atmospheric CO2 concentration at Bering Island rose from approximately 346 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1986 to 362.6 ppmv in 1993. Measurements from this station are considered indicative of maritime air masses. The period of record at Kotelny Island is too short to identify any long-term trends in atmospheric CO2 concentrations; however, the yearly mean atmospheric CO2 concentration at Kotelny Island rose from 356.08 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1988 to 358.8 ppmv in 1993. Because Kotelny Island is the northernmost Russian sampling site, measurements from this site serve as a useful comparison to other northern sites (e.g., Alert, Northwest Territories). In late 1989, air sampling began at the Russian site of Kyzylcha, located in the Republic of Uzbekistan. Unfortunately, the desert site at Kyzylcha has been out of operation since mid-1991 due to financial difficulties in Russia. The annual mean value of 359.02 parts per million by volume (ppmv) for 1990, the lone full year of operation, is higher than measurements from other monitoring programs at this latitude [e.g., Niwot Ridge (354.7 ppmv in 1990) and Tae-ahn Peninsula]. Station "C," an open ocean site, in the North Atlantic, east of Greenland, was established in 1968 and was operated in cooperation with NOAA's National Weather Service through 1973. The Main Geophysical Observatory collected flask samples at the site from January 1983 through October 1990. The yearly mean atmospheric CO concentration at Station "C" rose from 348.15 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1985 to 354.33 ppmv in 1989. The period of record at Teriberka Station is too short to identify any long-term trends in atmospheric CO2 concentrations; however, the yearly mean atmospheric CO2 concentration at Teriberka Station rose from 354.8 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1989 to 358.7 ppmv in 1993. « less
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    Research Org:
    Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
    Sponsoring Org:
    USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)