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Title: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa (1958-2008)

Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5 L/min. Every 30 minutes, the flow is replaced by a stream of calibrating gas or "working reference gas". In December 1983, CO2-in-N2 calibration gases were replaced with the currently used CO2-in-air calibration gases. These calibration gases and other reference gases are compared periodically to determine the instrument sensitivity and to check for possible contamination in the air-handling system. These reference gases are themselves calibrated against specific standard gases whose CO2 concentrations are determined manometrically. Greater details about the sampling methods at Mauna Loa are given in Keeling et al. (1982) and Keeling et al. (2002).
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1394401

Keeling, R. F., Piper, S. C., Bollenbacher, A. F., and Walker, J. S. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa (1958-2008). United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035.
Keeling, R. F., Piper, S. C., Bollenbacher, A. F., & Walker, J. S. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa (1958-2008). United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035.
Keeling, R. F., Piper, S. C., Bollenbacher, A. F., and Walker, J. S. 2009. "Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa (1958-2008)". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394401.
@misc{osti_1394401,
title = {Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa (1958-2008)},
author = {Keeling, R. F. and Piper, S. C. and Bollenbacher, A. F. and Walker, J. S.},
abstractNote = {Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5 L/min. Every 30 minutes, the flow is replaced by a stream of calibrating gas or "working reference gas". In December 1983, CO2-in-N2 calibration gases were replaced with the currently used CO2-in-air calibration gases. These calibration gases and other reference gases are compared periodically to determine the instrument sensitivity and to check for possible contamination in the air-handling system. These reference gases are themselves calibrated against specific standard gases whose CO2 concentrations are determined manometrically. Greater details about the sampling methods at Mauna Loa are given in Keeling et al. (1982) and Keeling et al. (2002).},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035},
year = {2009},
month = {2} }
  1. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a data archive for Earth and environmental science data. The mission of ESS-DIVE is to preserve, expand access to, and improve usability of critical data generated through DOE-sponsored research of terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems. By making ESS research data easily accessible, ESS-DIVE has the potential to advance the scientific understanding and prediction of hydro-biogeochemical and ecosystem processes that occur from bedrock through soil and vegetation to the atmospheric interface.
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