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Title: Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (NDP-009)

From June 28 to October 29 in 1982, Virginia pine seedlings were exposed to elevated CO2 levels in open-top growth chambers at one of four concentrations (75, 150, 300, and 600 ppm above ambient). Plant dry weight; height; stem diameter; and chemical contents of leaf, stem, and root tissues were measured before and after exposure. Soil variables were also characterized. These data illustrate the short-term physical and chemical response of Virginia pine seedlings to elevated levels of CO2. The data are in seven files: initial dry weights before exposure (844 kB), dry weights after exposure (4 kB), major nutrient concentrations after final harvest (12 kB), minor nutrient concentrations after final harvest (17 kB), soil nutrient concentrations after final harvest (4 kB), soil leachate elements after final harvest (5 kB), and soil leachate solutes after final harvest (4 kB).
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
  2. Agricultural Research Service, USDA; North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (USA)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
NDP-009
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Nutrient Uptake and Growth Responses of Virginia Pine to Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. R. J. Luxmoore, E. G. O'Neill, J. M. Ells and H. H. Rogers, Journal of Environmental Quality Abstract Access Only1986 15: 3: 244-251, doi:10.2134/jeq1986.00472425001500030008x
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Related Identifiers:
OSTI Identifier:
1389536

Luxmoore, R. J., Norby, R. J., O'Neill, E. G., Weller, D. G., Ells, J. M., and Rogers, H. H. Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (NDP-009). United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/VRC.NDP009.
Luxmoore, R. J., Norby, R. J., O'Neill, E. G., Weller, D. G., Ells, J. M., & Rogers, H. H. Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (NDP-009). United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/VRC.NDP009.
Luxmoore, R. J., Norby, R. J., O'Neill, E. G., Weller, D. G., Ells, J. M., and Rogers, H. H. 1985. "Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (NDP-009)". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/VRC.NDP009. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389536.
@misc{osti_1389536,
title = {Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (NDP-009)},
author = {Luxmoore, R. J. and Norby, R. J. and O'Neill, E. G. and Weller, D. G. and Ells, J. M. and Rogers, H. H.},
abstractNote = {From June 28 to October 29 in 1982, Virginia pine seedlings were exposed to elevated CO2 levels in open-top growth chambers at one of four concentrations (75, 150, 300, and 600 ppm above ambient). Plant dry weight; height; stem diameter; and chemical contents of leaf, stem, and root tissues were measured before and after exposure. Soil variables were also characterized. These data illustrate the short-term physical and chemical response of Virginia pine seedlings to elevated levels of CO2. The data are in seven files: initial dry weights before exposure (844 kB), dry weights after exposure (4 kB), major nutrient concentrations after final harvest (12 kB), minor nutrient concentrations after final harvest (17 kB), soil nutrient concentrations after final harvest (4 kB), soil leachate elements after final harvest (5 kB), and soil leachate solutes after final harvest (4 kB).},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/VRC.NDP009},
year = {1985},
month = {1} }
  1. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a data archive for Earth and environmental science data. The mission of ESS-DIVE is to preserve, expand access to, and improve usability of critical data generated through DOE-sponsored research of terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems. By making ESS research data easily accessible, ESS-DIVE has the potential to advance the scientific understanding and prediction of hydro-biogeochemical and ecosystem processes that occur from bedrock through soil and vegetation to the atmospheric interface.
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