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Title: Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation

Previously published data from 625 paired soil samples were used to predict carbon in cultivated soil as a function of initial carbon content. A 30-cm sampling depth provided a less variable estimate (r 2 = 0.9) of changes in carbon than a 15-cm sampling depth (r 2 = 0.6). Regression analyses of changes in carbon storage in relation to years of cultivation confirmed that the greatest rates of change occurred in the first 20 y. An initial carbon effect was present in all analyses: soils very low in carbon tended to gain slight amounts of carbon after cultivation, but soils high in carbon lost at least 20% during cultivation. Carbon losses from most agricultural soils are estimated to average less than 20% of initial values or less than 1.5 kg/m 2 within the top 30 cm. These estimates should not be applied to depths greater than 30 cm and would be improved with more bulk density information and equivalent sample volumes.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389524

Mann, L. K.. Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.007.
Mann, L. K.. Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation. United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.007.
Mann, L. K.. 2004. "Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389524.
@misc{osti_1389524,
title = {Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation},
author = {Mann, L. K.},
abstractNote = {Previously published data from 625 paired soil samples were used to predict carbon in cultivated soil as a function of initial carbon content. A 30-cm sampling depth provided a less variable estimate (r2 = 0.9) of changes in carbon than a 15-cm sampling depth (r2 = 0.6). Regression analyses of changes in carbon storage in relation to years of cultivation confirmed that the greatest rates of change occurred in the first 20 y. An initial carbon effect was present in all analyses: soils very low in carbon tended to gain slight amounts of carbon after cultivation, but soils high in carbon lost at least 20% during cultivation. Carbon losses from most agricultural soils are estimated to average less than 20% of initial values or less than 1.5 kg/m2 within the top 30 cm. These estimates should not be applied to depths greater than 30 cm and would be improved with more bulk density information and equivalent sample volumes.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.007},
year = {2004},
month = {1} }
  1. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a data archive for Earth and environmental science data. The mission of ESS-DIVE is to preserve, expand access to, and improve usability of critical data generated through DOE-sponsored research of terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems. By making ESS research data easily accessible, ESS-DIVE has the potential to advance the scientific understanding and prediction of hydro-biogeochemical and ecosystem processes that occur from bedrock through soil and vegetation to the atmospheric interface.
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