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Title: PoroTomo Project: Brady's Field, Station BRDY

Files with links to RINEX files for station BRDY not previously reported
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
679
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006760
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; University of Wisconsin
Collaborations:
University of Wisconsin
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-2C)
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geothermal; gps; geodesy
OSTI Identifier:
1254453
  1. The Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) is the submission point for all data collected from researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE GTO). The DOE GTO is providing access to its geothermal project information through the GDR. The GDR is powered by OpenEI, an energy information portal sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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  1. This database contains monthly mean surface temperature and mean sea level pressure data from twenty-nine meteorological stations within the Antarctic region. The first version of this database was compiled at the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom. The databasemore » extended through 1988 and was made available in 1989 by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), NDP-032. This update of the database includes data through early 1999 for most stations (through 2000 for a few), and also includes all available mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature data. For many stations this means that over 40 years of data are now available, enough for many of the trends associated with recent warming to be more thoroughly examined. Much of the original version of this dataset was obtained from the World Weather Records (WWR) volumes (1951-1970), Monthly Climatic Data for the World (since 1961), and several other sources. Updating the station surface data involved requesting data from countries who have weather stations on Antarctica. Of particular importance within this study are the additional data obtained from Australia, Britain and New Zealand. Recording Antarctic station data is particularly prone to errors. This is mostly due to climatic extremes, the nature of Antarctic science, and the variability of meteorological staff at Antarctic stations (high turnover and sometimes untrained meteorological staff). For this compilation, as many sources as possible were contacted in order to obtain as close to official `source' data as possible. Some error checking has been undertaken and hopefully the final result is as close to a definitive database as possible. This NDP consists of this html documentation file, an ASCII text version of this file, six temperature files (three original CRU files for monthly maximum, monthly minimum, and monthly mean temperature and three equivalent files slightly reformatted at CDIAC), two monthly mean pressure data files (one original CRU file and one slightly reformatted CDIAC version of the file), four graphics files that describe the station network and the nature of temperature and pressure trends, a file summarizing annual and mean-monthly trends in surface temperatures over Antarctica, a file summarizing monthly Antarctic surface temperature anomalies with respect to the period 1961-90, a station inventory file, and 3 FORTRAN and 3 SAS routines for reading the data that may be incorporated into analysis programs that users may devise. These 23 files have a total size of approximately 2 megabytes and are available via the Internet through CDIAC's Web site or anonymous FTP (File Transfer Protocol) server, and, upon request, various magnetic media. « less
  2. Meteorological data are currently being collected at two locations at the Teller Site, Seward Peninsula. Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussock / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurementsmore » and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products. « less
  3. Meteorological data are currently being collected at one location at the top of the Kougarok hill, Seward Peninsula. This December 18, 2017 release includes data for: Teller Creek Station near TL_BSV (TELLER BOTTOM METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the lower watershed in a tussockmore » / willow transition zone and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Teller Creek Station near TL_IS_5 (TELLER TOP METEOROLOGICAL STATION) Station is located in the upper watershed and co-located with continuous snow depth measurements and subsurface measurements. Two types of data products are provided for these stations: First, meteorological and site characterization data grouped by sensor/measurement type (e.g., radiation or soil pit temperature and moisture). These are *.csv files. Second, a Data Visualization tool is provided for quick visualization of measurements over time at a station. Download the *_Visualizer.zip file, extract, and click on the 'index.html' file. Data values are the same in both products. « less
  4. In the 1960s, thermonuclear bomb tests released significant pulses of radioactive 14C into the atmosphere. This major perturbation allowed scientists to study the dynamics of the global carbon cycle by measuring and observing rates of isotopic exchange. The Radiological Dating Laboratory at the Norwegian Institutemore » of Technology performed 14C measurements in atmospheric CO2 from 1962 to 1993 at a network of ground stations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These measurements were supplemented during 1965 with high-altitude (9-12.6 km) air samples collected using aircraft from the Norwegian Air Force. The resulting database, coupled with other 14C data sets, provides a greater understanding of the dynamic carbon reservoir and a crude picture of anomalous sources and sinks at different geographical latitudes. This database is outstanding for its inclusion of early 14C measurements, broad spatial coverage of sampling, consistency of sampling method, and 14C calculation results corrected for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay. This database replaces previous versions published by the authors and the Radiological Dating Laboratory. Fourteen stations spanning latitudes from Spitsbergen (78° N) to Madagascar (21° S) were used for sampling during the lifetime of the Norwegian program. Some of the stations have data for only a brief period, while others have measurements through 1993. Sampling stations subject to local industrial CO2 contamination were avoided. The sites have sufficient separation to describe the latitudinal distribution of 14C in atmospheric models. The sampling procedure for all the surface (10-2400 m asl) 14C measurements in this database consisted of quantitative absorption of atmospheric CO2 in carbonate-free 0.5 N NaOH solution. The 14C measurements were made in a CO2 proportional counter and calculated (14C) as per mil excess above the normal 14C level defined by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Atmospheric 14C content is finally expressed as 14C, which is the relative deviation of the measured 14C activity from the NIST oxalic acid standard activity, after correction for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay related to age. The data are organized by sampling station, and each record of the database contains the sampling dates; values for 14C excess (14C) relative to the NIST standard, fractionation 13C (13C) relative to the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard, and corrected 14C ( 14C) excess; and the standard deviation for 14C. The 14C calculation results presented here are thus corrected for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay, and constitute the final product of a research effort that has spanned three decades. The 14C station data show a sharp increase in tropospheric radiocarbon levels in the early 1960s and then a decline after the majority of nuclear tests came to an end on August 5, 1963 (Test Ban Treaty). The sharp peaks in tropospheric radiocarbon in the early 1960s are more pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere, reflecting the location of most atomic weapons tests. The measurements show large seasonal variations in the 14C level during the early 1960s mainly as a result of springtime transport of bomb 14C from the stratosphere. During the 1970s, the seasonal variations are smaller and due partly to seasonal variations in CO2 from fossil-fuel emissions. The rate of decrease of atmospheric radiocarbon provides a check on the exchange constants of the atmosphere and ocean. This report and all data it describes are available from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) without charge. The Nydal and Lövseth atmospheric 14C database comprises 21 data files totaling 0.2 megabytes in size. The following report describes the sampling methods and analysis. In addition, the report includes a complete discussion of CDIAC's data-processing efforts, the contents and format of the data files, and a reprint of a Nydal and Lövseth journal article. « less
  5. Files with links to RINEX files for station BRAD not previously reported