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Title: AmeriFlux US-Elm Everglades (long hydroperiod marsh)

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Elm Everglades (long hydroperiod marsh).
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. Florida International University
  2. University of Alabama
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; Florida International University; University of Alabama
Sponsoring Org:
NSF/OPP
OSTI Identifier:
1246118
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
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  1. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Esm Everglades (short hydroperiod marsh).
  2. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. Site Description - The Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest site is located along the Shark River in the western region of Everglades Nationalmore » Park. Also referred to as site SRS6 of the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER program, freshwater in the mangrove riverine floods the forest floor under a meter of water twice per day. Transgressive discharge of freshwater from the Shark river follows annual rainfall distributions between the wet and dry seasons. Hurricane Wilma struck the site in October of 2005 causing significant damage. The tower was offline until the following October in order to continue temporally consistent measurements. In post-hurricane conditions, ecosystem respiration rates and solar irradiance transfer increased. 2007- 2008 measurements indicate that these factors led to an decline in both annual -NEE and daily NEE from pre-hurricane conditions in 2004-2005. « less
  3. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-WPT Winous Point North Marsh. Site Description - The marsh site has been owned by the Winous Point Shooting Club since 1856 and has been managed by wildlife biologists since 1946. Themore » hydrology of the marsh is relatively isolated by the surrounding dikes and drainages and only receives drainage from nearby croplands through three connecting ditches. Since 2001, the marsh has been managed to maintain year-round inundation with the lowest water levels in September. Within the 0–250 m fetch of the tower, the marsh comprises 42.9% of floating-leaved vegetation, 52.7% of emergent vegetation, and 4.4% of dike and upland during the growing season. Dominant emergent plants include narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia), rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos), and bur reed (Sparganium americanum). Common floating-leaved species are water lily (Nymphaea odorata) and American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) with foliage usually covering the water surface from late May to early October. « less
  4. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ORv Olentangy River Wetland Research Park. Site Description - The ORWRP site is a 21-ha large-scale, long-term wetland campus facility that is owned by Ohio State University. It is designed to providemore » teaching, research, and service related to wetland and river science and ecological engineering. The site has been developed in several phases: Phase 1 (1992 - 1994) - Construction of two 2.5-acre deepwater marshes and a river water delivery system began, with pumps installed on the floodplain to bring water from the Olentangy River. In May 1994, one wetland was planted with marsh vegetation, while the other remained as an unplanted control; Phase 2 (1994 - 1999) - Development of a research and teaching infrastructure took place with the construction of boardwalks, a pavilion, and a compound. The creation of the 7-acre naturally flooded oxbow was also included; Phase 3 (2000 - 2003) - As a research building was created, three additional wetlands were created in the vicinity of the building, including a stormwater wetland that receives runoff from the roof of the building; Phase 4 - The current phase involves research access to the Olentangy River. « less
  5. This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.. Site Description - Groundhog River (FCRN or CCP site "ON-OMW") is situated in a typical boreal mixedwood forest in northeastern Ontario (48.217 degrees northmore » and 82.156 degrees west) about 80 km southwest of Timmins in Reeves Twp. near the Groundhog River. Rowe (1972) places the site in the Missinaibi-Cabonga Section of the Boreal Forest Region. In terms of ecoregion and ecozone, the site is in the Lake Timiskaming Lowlands of the Boreal Shield. The forest developed after high-grade logging in the 1930's. The average age in 2013 is estimated at beteen 75 and 80 years. The forest is dominated by five species characteristic of Ontario boreal mixedwoods: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss.), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.). The surficial geology is a lacustrine deposit of varved or massive clays, silts and silty sands. The soil is an orthic gleysol with a soil moisture regime classified as fresh to very fresh. Plonski (1974) rates it as a site class 1. The topography is simple and flat with an overall elevation of 340 m ASL. « less